Kala Dunn

Operations Assistant and Board Operator

Kala Dunn is a native of Princeton, Ky. She’s a 2006 graduate of the Interlochen Arts Academy with a concentration in flute performance and a 2010 graduate of Murray State University with a B.M. in piano performance. She is employed by Physical Medicine Services. Her hobbies include yoga, kayaking, reading, running, and listening to music. She lives in Hamlin, Ky.

Pages

Datebook
10:45 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Datebook: March 13 - Act Prohibiting the Return of Slaves 150 Years Ago

"Contraband" - escaped slaves captured by the Union
Library of Congress

On March 13, 1862, Congress approved an act prohibiting the military from sending escaped slaves back into slavery. The Act of Prohibiting the Return of Slaves was spawned as a result of Union armies entering Southern territory, and some commanders putting fleeing slaves to work digging trenches, building fortifications, and performing other camp work. These slaves were called "contraband," emphasizing their status as captured enemy property. The reaction from Congress effectively annulled the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 and set the stage for the Emancipation Proclamation.

 

Read more
Datebook
10:21 am
Mon March 12, 2012

Datebook: March 12 - Jack Kerouac turns 90

Jack Kerouac was born on March 12, 1922 (and died October 21, 1969). He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation. Kerouac is recognized for his spontaneous method of writing, covering topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. His writings have inspired other writers, including Ken Kesey, Bob Dylan, Eddie Vedder, Richard Brautigan, Curtis Meanor, Thomas Pynchon, Lester Bangs, Tom Robbins, Will Clarke, Ben Gibbard, Haruki Murakami, Jacquelyn Landgraf.

Read more
Datebook
11:11 am
Fri March 9, 2012

Datebook: March 9 - Gold Discovered in California 170 Years Ago

Leon Worden, www.scvhistory.com

On March 9, 1842, Francisco Lopez took a rest under an oak tree in Placerita Canyon and had a dream that he was floating on a pool of gold. When he awoke, he pulled a few wild onions from the ground and found flakes of gold clinging to the roots. Lopez had studied mineralogy at the University of Mexico, so some believe he had actually been systematically looking for gold. Lopez's discovery was the first documented discovery of gold in the state. This sparked a minor gold rush for several years until the word got out and became the famous California Gold Rush in 1848.  How about that?

Read more
Datebook
11:08 am
Thu March 8, 2012

Datebook: March 8 - International Women's Day (and the 310th Birthday of Anne Bonny)

It's International Women's Day! Celebrations range from general celebration of respect, appreciation and love towards women to a celebration for women's economic, political and social achievements. It also happens to be the 310th birthday of one of the most famous and notorious female pirates, Anne Bonny! Anne Bonny was an Irish woman who became a famous and feared pirate operating in the Caribbean in the early 1700s.  Anne was notably beautiful, with flowing red hair. She married a poor sailor and small-time pirate named James Bonny. She was disowned by her father, a wealthy merchant.

Read more
Datebook
8:18 am
Wed March 7, 2012

Datebook: March 7 - Happy Purim!

Purim is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people in the ancient Persian Empire from destruction in the wake of a plot by Haman, a story recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther.

Read more
Datebook
12:14 pm
Tue March 6, 2012

Datebook: March 6 - Oreo Cookie Turns 100

Nabisco founded the Oreo brand on March 6, 1912 in Chelsea, New York City. Nearly 500 billion Oreo cookies have been sold since they were introduced, making them the best-selling cookie of the 20th century. Their original slogan was "America's Favorite Cookie," and based on the sales figures, this seems like no exaggeration. It was originally called the 'Oreo Biscuit' and the design was simpler, and they were sold for 25 cents a pound in novelty cans with glass tops.

Read more
Datebook
10:23 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Datebook: March 5 - Gerardus Mercator turns 500

Gerardus Mercator was a Flemish cartographer, born on March 5, 1512. He is remembered for the Mercator projection world map, which is named after him. This proved very useful to many later navigators who could, using his map, sail across the entire ocean on approximately straight paths, called rhumb lines. Mercator's first independent map was of Palestine in 1537. In 1544, he was charged with heresy and imprisoned for seven months on the basis of sympathy for Protestant believes and suspicious about his frequent travels.

Read more
Datebook
10:43 am
Fri March 2, 2012

Datebook: March 2 - Wilt Chamberlain's 100-Point Game 50 Years Ago

Wilt Chamberlain set the single-game scoring record in the NBA by scoring 100 points for the Philadelphia Warriors in a 169–147 win over the New York Knicks on March 2, 1962, at Hershey Sports Arena in Hershey, Pennsylvania. Chamberlain set five other league records that game including most free throws made. Both teams broke the record for most combined points in a game (316). In the fourth quarter, the Knicks began fouling other players to keep the ball away from Chamberlain, and they also became deliberate on offense to reduce the number of possessions for Philadelphia.

Read more
Datebook
11:45 am
Thu March 1, 2012

Datebook: March 1 - Salem Witch Trials Begin 320 Years Ago

On March 1, 1692, three women: Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba were brought before local magistrates in Salem Village, Massachusetts, beginning what would be known as the Salem Witch Trials.  In the winter months, two girls (ages 9 and 11), began to have fits described as "beyond the power of epileptic fits or natural disease to effect" by a nearby minister. The girls complained of being pinched by pins, although a local doctor could find no evidence of such. The three women were accused and arrested for afflicting the girls.

Read more
Datebook
10:49 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Datebook: February 29 - Leap Day!

It's Leap Day! You know you were looking forward to it... until you woke up to severe weather, anyway. A complete revolution around the sun takes approximately 365 days and 6 hours. Every four years, during which an extra 24 hours have accumulated, one extra day is added to keep the count coordinated with the sun's position. Well... technically it's five hours, 49 minutes, and 16 seconds. In order to account for this, an end-of-century year is not considered a leap year unless it's exactly divisible by 400 (so 1600 and 2000 were leap years, but 1900 wasn't and neither will 2100). 

Read more

Pages