Erica Peterson (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Erica Peterson is a reporter and Kentucky Public Radio correspondent based out of WFPL in Louisville, Kentucky.

iStockPhoto

Kentucky’s coal industry shed more jobs and production during the last quarter of 2015, according to new data released today.

123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky has gotten mixed grades in a nationwide report card of states’ solar energy policies.

www.dailyyonder.com

After a federal Court of Appeals rejected an industry-led challenge last month, a new federal rule to reduce coal miners’ exposure to dangerous dust goes into effect Monday.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky announced on Thursday that it began offering abortions at its new Louisville location last week.

Knowledgeum, via Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Kentucky’s head environmental regulator says the state is hopeful the courts will rule upcoming federal carbon dioxide regulations are illegal.

But if not, the state will likely create a state plan to comply, he said.

iLoveMountains.org / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentucky environmental advocates are worried that budget reductions called for by Gov. Matt Bevin will make it impossible for the Energy and Environment Cabinet to perform its basic functions.

NRDC

Two bills before the Kentucky House would change the way the state taxes coal that’s left in the ground.

The “unmined minerals tax” applies to minerals such as coal, gas, oil and limestone that aren’t currently being extracted.

Austin Ramsey, WKMS

Eleven coal miners died on the job in 2015, marking a new record low for coal mine deaths in the U.S. Two of the victims were in Kentucky.

NRDC

The massive omnibus spending bill passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama last week is more than 2,000 pages long and lays out the next year of government spending.

And it also contains some unexpected Christmas presents for the hard-hit coalfields of Appalachia.

NRDC

The new head of the state’s Energy and Environment Cabinet, Charles Snavely, has been on the job for a little more than a week. It’s also been about that long since he served as an official on the state’s coal association governing board.

Pages