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Interviews
7:47 am
Sun August 2, 2015

After Katrina, One Sister Moves On; For Another, 'Tomorrow Never Came'

Huge shafts of light strike the littered playing field of the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans on Sept. 2, 2005 four days after Hurricane Katrina. The Superdome was a squalid shelter to tens of thousands of residents for days after the storm, including the Halley sisters and their mother.
Bill Haber AP

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 8:37 am

Ten years ago this month, the monster storm Hurricane Katrina thundered through New Orleans and coastal Mississippi and Alabama. Many who survived the storm and its aftermath are still feeling its terrible impact.

This week on For the Record: Hurricane Katrina's mark on one family, 10 years later.

In 2005, sisters Regina and Talitha Halley, had just moved out of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, into a new house on Spain Street. Regina, now 33, took care of her sister full time while their mom worked as a professional caregiver.

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Religion
7:28 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Mormons Face A Painful Loss If The Church Severs Boy Scout Ties

Boy Scouts work on canoes at camp Maple Dell outside Payson, Utah. The Mormon Church is considering pulling out of its 102 year old relationship with the Boy Scouts after the Boy Scouts changed it's policy on allowing gay leaders in the organization.
George Frey Getty Images

The vote by the Boy Scouts of America to lift its ban on openly gay troop leaders last week was a blow to some religious conservative organizations that have long been connected to scouting, especially the Mormon Church, which has deep roots in the Boy Scouts.

The church, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, has used the Boy Scouts as its official program for young men for more than 100 years, according to Qin Monson, a political science professor at Brigham Young University.

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Parallels
7:28 am
Sun August 2, 2015

In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

Traditional architecture and modern skyscrapers overlap in central Seoul.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Anytime I need to update a bunch of apps on my smartphone, I'm going to fly to South Korea to do it.

I'm only partly joking.

The Internet speeds are so fast here, they make me feel like the U.S. is living in the past.

And it's not just the Internet. The subways here are clean, and on time, with air conditioning and Wi-Fi.

Since I arrived in Seoul, I've lost track of the number of Americans who've told me, "Incheon in my favorite airport in the world."

Now, the journalistic cliché would be to say, "This didn't happen overnight!"

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Politics
7:28 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Obama To Detail Tougher Plan To Fight Climate Change

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 9:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
6:30 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Could Biden Catch Clinton In A White House Bid?

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
6:27 am
Sun August 2, 2015

NFL's First Female Coach Raises The Perennial 'Distraction' Question

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Interviews
6:27 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Colombia's La Momposina Sings A Tangled Social History

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 7:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
6:21 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

Aviator Beryl Markham Soars Again In 'Paris Wife' Author's New Book

Lydia Thompson NPR

Beryl Markham was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic from East to West. The British-born Kenyan woman was also a racehorse trainer, a writer and a fearless adventurer.

Once famous as an aviation pioneer, she's largely dropped out of the public consciousness. But novelist Paula McClain has put her back in the spotlight — as the protagonist of her new novel, Circling the Sun.

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Law
5:18 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

A Lawyer's Advice For Black Men At Traffic Stops: 'Comply Now, Contest Later'

Demonstrators hold up a placard of a man with his hands up during the "Justice For All" march in Washington, DC last December. Numerous protests have brought attention to police violence against people of color. One lawyer, while emphasizing that police are responsible for behaving professionally, also wants to give black men advice on how to survive encounters with police.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 5:55 pm

It's been nearly a year since a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American 18-year-old, in Ferguson, Mo. Since then, more deadly police encounters across the country have prompted anger, activism and reform.

Many of those incidents began with traffic stops — routine events that quickly turned deadly. And attorney Eric Broyles says that the risks for citizens are not distributed evenly.

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My Big Break
4:15 pm
Sat August 1, 2015

Reggie Watts, Man Of Many Voices, Improvised His Way To Success

Reggie Watts calls his form of entertainment "disinformationist." He disorients his audience, sometimes talking non-sense and switching seamlessly between accents — all improvised on the spot.
Kyle Christy

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 5:55 pm

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

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