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Author Interviews
4:01 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

From Sizzling Fajitas, To The Super Bowl, How Sounds Help Sell

cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Joel Beckerman believes we are living in a golden age of sound: "We have these amazing opportunities to both set the tone and experiences for people, give them information in an instant," he tells NPR's Audie Cornish.

Beckerman is a composer who specializes in sonic branding — and we're not just talking about jingles. These are the sonic cues in commercials, the ambient music in coffee shops, in the beeps, dings and whoosh that occasionally flies from your cell phone. And companies are embracing it.

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All Tech Considered
4:01 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

Ramzi El-Fekih, CEO of Creova, stands in his server room in Tunis. He's built a mobile payments company, but because of banking restrictions, Tunisians can only use his product for domestic purchases.
Aarti Shahani NPR

This Sunday, Tunisia — the country that gave birth to Arab Spring — will elect a Parliament. Millions of citizens will vote at the polls, and thousands will run for office.

It's a sea change since the days of ousted dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. But behind the political gains, there is a sad fact: The new democracy is at an economic standstill. The technology sector — which many say could deliver jobs to unemployed young people — is victim to political inertia.

Startups In A Closed Economy

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Environment
3:24 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Why Are The Great Lakes On The Rise?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:24 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Turkey Opens Border For Iraqis Seeking To Fight ISIS

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 4:01 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book News & Features
3:24 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

'Lila' Sets The Stage For Marilynn Robinson's Earlier Works

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 3:44 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World Cafe
1:07 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

World Cafe Next: The Stray Birds

The Stray Birds.
Doug Seymour Courtesy of the artist

Multi-instrumentalists and vocalists Maya de Vitry, Oliver Craven and Charlie Muench formed The Stray Birds in Lancaster, Penn., in 2012, though they'd known each other and performed together in the city's tight-knit music community prior to that. The group's self-titled debut was well-received in folk circles, and was named one of NPR's Top 10 folk and Americana albums for 2012.

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World Cafe
12:22 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

The Budos Band On World Cafe

The Budos Band.
Justin Borucki Courtesy of the artist

Brooklyn's nine-member Budos Band has a horn-driven sound, dubbed "Afro soul," which draws influence from funk and Afrobeat. As such, the group's new Burnt Offering fits perfectly on the Daptone Records roster, known for its deep understanding of soul, funk, gospel and Afrobeat music.

On this episode of World Cafe, The Budos Band performs some of its new songs and explains how beer fits into its tight touring schedule.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
9:41 am
Mon October 20, 2014

The Look Of Power: How Women Have Dressed For Success

A publicity still from the movie Working Girl, which prominently featured the beloved power suit.
20th Century Fox

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 12:24 pm

Remember power suits? At the same time women were entering the corporate workplace in large numbers, the power suit began to pop up. It was usually a long jacket with the kind of big, padded shoulders Joan Crawford made famous, a straight skirt and, often, a floppy silk bow tie that Little Lord Fauntleroy would have been at home in. The 1980s power suit was designed to ignore a woman's shape so it didn't hinder her mobility as she worked her way up the corporate ladder.

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Education
8:52 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Report: Kentucky Spending on Public Education Lower Than Recession Levels

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 8:01 am

The shock of the recession still lingers in public schools across Kentucky.

In fact, the results of a recent report from the Washington D.C. based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities shows that the state spends $561 less per student in fiscal year 2015 than in fiscal year 2008. Adjusting for inflation, the rate is about 11 percent less than than the 2008 rate.

State legislators are slowly turning the rate around, said Brad Hughes, a spokesman for the Kentucky School Boards Association.

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All Tech Considered
5:23 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Will Apple's Mobile Wallet Replace Your Leather Wallet?

Apple Pay is demonstrated at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 2:27 pm

On Monday, Apple is rolling out a new way to pay: a digital wallet called Apple Pay. Millions of people with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus will be able to tap — rather than swipe — at the register.

The move could be a major change in how we shop. Or it could end up as a blip on the map that fades away, as other "mobile wallets" have in the past.

Here are some questions you might be asking:

I have a leather wallet in my back pocket. Am I going to have it a year from now, given this mobile-wallet revolution?

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