Black History Month 2013 http://wkms.org en Celebration Honors Hackett, Hudson as Black Leaders http://wkms.org/post/celebration-honors-hackett-hudson-black-leaders <p></p><p style="margin:0px 0px 15px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-size:15px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(51,51,51);font-family:Georgia,Times,serif;line-height:22px">FRANKFORT— &nbsp;Kentucky legislators and community leaders on Wednesday honored an&nbsp;athlete and an academic during the&nbsp;10th&nbsp;annual Black History Month Celebration at the&nbsp;Capitol.</p><p style="margin:0px 0px 15px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-size:15px;vertical-align:baseline;color:rgb(51,51,51);font-family:Georgia,Times,serif;line-height:22px">The 2013 Black History Month celebration honoree was Wilbur Louis Hackett&nbsp;Jr., a groundbreaking&nbsp;football player. He was also the 2011 Kentucky Black Sports Hall of Fame&nbsp;inductee who state Sen. Gerald Neal, of Louisville, said "epitomizes all that is good about sports." Thu, 07 Feb 2013 13:05:40 +0000 Rae Hodge 27754 at http://wkms.org Celebration Honors Hackett, Hudson as Black Leaders Humankind: Justice Denied http://wkms.org/post/humankind-justice-denied <p><strong>Sunday, February 3 at 9 a.m. &nbsp;</strong></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">How could a nation founded on a Declaration that "all men are created equal" permit slavery? Nowhere was this </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">contradiction more stark than at the Supreme Court, which formally ruled in the Dred Scott case that black&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">people have "no rights" -- a decision Abraham Lincoln adamantly opposed. In this one-hour <em>Humankind </em>special,&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">produced in association with </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">WGBH</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">/Boston, we'll learn about harsh public reaction when federal judges enforced&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">slavery through fugitive slave laws and the </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Dred</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Scott ruling.</span></p><div><em style="line-height: 1.5;">Humankind </em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">presents the riveting stories of everyday people who have found real purpose in life. Living by their principles - compassion, service, generosity, spirituality, equality, and integrity -they make a profound difference in the quality of life in their communities. Hosted and produced by David Freudberg, Humankind helps listeners examine some of humanity's biggest questions and illuminates the lives of ordinary people who, by their example, can inspire us all.&nbsp;</span></div><p> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 17:57:30 +0000 WKMS Staff 27521 at http://wkms.org Humankind: Justice Denied Let Freedom Sing: The Music of the Abolitionists http://wkms.org/post/let-freedom-sing-music-abolitionists <p><strong>Wednesday, February 6 at Noon</strong></p><p>Classical New England from WGBH offers a companion radio program to the Jan., 2013 PBS series <em>The Abolitionists: Let Freedom Sing: The Music of the Abolitionists.</em></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Let Freedom Sing chronicles the idealistic artists, uncompromising personalities and powerful music of the era, and looks at how these forces combined to turn abolitionism from a scorned fringe movement into a nation-changing force. This one-hour special will be hosted by Noah Adams.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">"Any good crusade requires singing," reformers like to say, and in the </span>19th<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> century, no cause was more righteous than the decades-long crusade to abolish slavery. An original </span>WGBH-Classical<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> New England production hosted by Noah Adams, Let Freedom Sing will profile such powerful figures as Henry Russell, the barnstorming Anglo-Jewish pianist and singer dubbed the master of "chutzpah and huzzah;" the Milford, New Hampshire-based Hutchinson Family Singers, remembered as America's first protest singers; and abolitionist leader and newspaper publisher William Lloyd Garrison, whose "Song of the Abolitionist" (set to the tune of "Auld Lang </span>Syne<span style="line-height: 1.5;">") literally set the tone for the entire movement. Garrison believed strongly in setting stanzas to familiar melodies—for poetry, he held, was "naturally and instinctively on the side of liberty."</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">And the program will explain how "My Country, '</span>Tis<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> of Thee" evolved from a patriotic ditty penned in a half-hour by Reverend Samuel Francis Smith to a stirring anthem of equality famously sung by Marian Anderson in 1939 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial…and reprised by </span>Aretha<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Franklin on the West Lawn of the US Capitol for the inauguration of President Barack Obama in 2009.</span></p><p> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 17:54:50 +0000 WKMS Staff 27520 at http://wkms.org Let Freedom Sing: The Music of the Abolitionists Humankind: Rubin Carter's Hurricane http://wkms.org/post/humankind-rubin-carters-hurricane <p><strong>Sunday, February 10 at 9 a.m.</strong></p><p>Memorialized in a Bob Dylan song and an Academy Award nominated Denzel Washington film, Rubin “Hurricane” Carter was a successful prize fighter, who was falsely accused of murder. After nearly two decades in prison, Carter was exonerated by a federal judge (also heard in our documentary) in a ruling later affirmed by the US Supreme Court. Now in his 70s and an outspoken advocate for others wrongly convicted, Carter recently published a spiritual memoir on how he emerged not only from physical incarceration, but from the emotional prison of hatred and bitterness.</p><p><em>Humankind </em>presents the riveting stories of everyday people who have found real purpose in life. Living by their principles - compassion, service, generosity, spirituality, equality, and integrity -they make a profound difference in the quality of life in their communities. Hosted and produced by David Freudberg, Humankind helps listeners examine some of humanity's biggest questions and illuminates the lives of ordinary people who, by their example, can inspire us all.&nbsp;</p><p> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 17:47:08 +0000 WKMS Staff 27518 at http://wkms.org Humankind: Rubin Carter's Hurricane Rethinking Religion - The Harlem Renaissance: Music, Religion, and the Politics of Race http://wkms.org/post/rethinking-religion-harlem-renaissance-music-religion-and-politics-race <p><strong>Sunday, February 17 at 9 a.m.</strong></p><p>From The Columbia University Institute For Religion, Culture and Public Life, and the Luce Group, an exploration in words and music of how music, religion, and politics intersected during this rich period in African American history.</p><p>During the vibrant years of the Harlem Renaissance, music, religion, and spirituality were interconnected -- not just in the religious setting of the church, but in the jazz club, the dance hall, the rent party, even the political street rally. &nbsp;Writer Carl Hancock Rux, Reverend Calvin Butts of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, historian Farah Griffin, Professors Josef Sorett and Obery Hendricks, and others explore these powerful interconnections. &nbsp;Includes the voices of Langston Hughes, poet Sterling Brown, Marcus Garvey, as well as readings from Hughes, Arna Bontemps, and musician James Reese Europe. &nbsp;Music includes Count Basie, Chick Webb, The Abyssinian Baptist Church Choir, Geri Allen, The Original Five Blind Boys of Alabama, Duke Ellington, Ma Rainey, Ella Fitzgerald, James Reese Europe's 369th US Infantry "Hell Fighters" Band, Mahalia Jackson, Ron Carter Big Band, Fats Waller, James P Johnson, WIllie The Lion Smith, Courtney Bryan, The Abyssinian Baptist Choir and more.&nbsp;</p><p> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 17:44:22 +0000 WKMS Staff 27517 at http://wkms.org Rethinking Religion - The Harlem Renaissance: Music, Religion, and the Politics of Race Race and the Space Race http://wkms.org/post/race-and-space-race <p><strong>Sunday, February 24 at 9 a.m.</strong></p><p><em>An unlikely story of Civil Rights and the Space Program.</em></p><p>The Space Age began when America was going through a wrenching battle over Civil Rights. &nbsp;And because the heart of the old Confederacy was chosen as its base, NASA &nbsp;played an unintended role in Civil Rights history. &nbsp;In this program, we hear how this happened and we hear the stories of the people who broke the color line at NASA. &nbsp;Their stories of frustration and their stories of perseverance. &nbsp;Produced by Richard Paul with <em>Soundprint </em>and narrated by Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman in Space, “Race and the Space Race” tells the unlikely story of Civil Rights and the Space Program.</p><p> Fri, 01 Feb 2013 17:40:23 +0000 WKMS Staff 27516 at http://wkms.org Race and the Space Race