wwii

Matt Markgraf, WKMS - courtesy of Pogue Library

As we reflect on Pearl Harbor on the 75th anniversary today, much of what we know about that event and World War II is in part due to the work of an historian from western Kentucky. On Sounds Good, Matt Markgraf speaks with Murray State University Pogue Library Special Collections curator Sarah Hopley about the library's namesake, Forrest C. Pogue, and his work during and after WWII. He also created the library's oral histories collection, featuring voices from numerous individuals from the region, including many who vividly remember Pearl Harbor and WWII. 

Updated at 11 a.m. ET on Dec. 8

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will visit Pearl Harbor later this month, becoming the first Japanese head of state to visit the memorial at the site of the surprise attack.

President Obama will accompany Abe on the visit, which is scheduled for Dec. 27. The 75th anniversary of the attack is this Wednesday.

City of Henderson, KY Government, via Facebook

Just days before the 75th anniversary of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, a western Kentucky community has unveiled a statue in honor of the commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. 

The Gleaner reports the bronze statue of Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel was dedicated Saturday in his hometown of Henderson. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS, courtesy of Pogue Library

During the second world war, the fledgling Murray State Teacher's College, like many schools during this time, was at risk of closing due to low attendance had it not been for the efforts of the administration to open up the campus as a Navy Pre-Flight Training School. Murray State's Pogue Library has a meticulously kept collection of documents from this time period, so as we think of our veterans this week, Matt Markgraf stopped by the library to speak with Sarah Hopley, Special Collections & Exhibits Librarian, about how this training school "saved" Murray State, beginning with some historical context.

Playhouse in the Park, Facebook

Playhouse in the Park presents a new adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank by Wendy Kesselman, a drama about the lives of eight people hiding from the Nazis in a storage attic during WWII and the claustrophobic realities of their daily existence, fears and hopes. The story emerges from the historical account written by Anne Frank and her thoughts on the experience and growing up. Director Don Fleming and cast member Amanda Futrell, who portrays Petronella Van Daan, stop by Sounds Good to preview the production, opening this weekend.

Jenni Todd, WKMS

Calloway County Public Library has a new website for Spring 2015 and its filled with information about community events and activities. Sandy Linn stops by Sounds Good with a preview of some of those activities, including a series of programs featuring holocaust survivor Fred Gross and a literacy night on March 26 with education students.

How Community Groups Can Book Speakers for Events

Aug 7, 2013

Kate Lochte speaks with Constance Alexander, Kentucky Humanities Council presenter and Murray State TQI Faculty Scholar and poet, on how community groups can book speakers for events. They talk about the Kentucky Humanities Council and how Constance became involved and one of her topics, "Connecting People and Place," about the people who used to live in and around what is now the general LBL area. They also talk about memories of WWII and its impact on society.

creativeadawards.com

From NPR: Lego has provided many boys with hours of play, and thanks to a Seattle entrepreneur the little plastic men can teach history too. Will Chapman wanted to teach his son about World War II by acting out history, but he couldn’t find the pieces he needed to do so. That’s why he started BrickArms, where he turns blank Lego pieces into WWII soldiers.

Product Description:

Journey Story: Sarah Gutwirth

Mar 9, 2012

This is a family story, a story of loss and exile, and of the intersection of personal history with large historical events.  It is also a quintessentially American story of arrival, and of a second chance.  This is a story so close to me I seem always to have known it.  It is the story of how my father came to America.