workers comp

U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Thomas Perez says his agency will use its "bully pulpit" to strike at what he calls "a disturbing trend" that leaves workers without medical care and wage replacement payments when they are injured on the job.

In an interview with NPR, Perez also confirms a Labor Department investigation of an opt-out alternative to state-regulated workers' compensation that has saved employers millions of dollars but that he says is "undermining that basic bargain" for American workers.

wikimedia.org

The Tennessee House has approved Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's bill to change the way the state considers injured workers' claims after defeating several attempts by Democrats to dial back the proposal.

The chamber voted 68-24 to approve the bill. The Senate would have to agree to minor changes before the measure can head to the governor.

wikimedia.org

All that stands in the way of an overhaul of the Tennessee workers compensation system are a few votes in the state House. The Senate passed one of the governor’s biggest priorities of the year last night.

People who get hurt on the job would no longer get the benefit of the doubt under the proposed law. It would also create an entirely new state agency to mediate disputes over workers comp claims, instead of requiring both sides to go to court.

An overhaul of the state’s workers compensation system began moving forward in the Tennessee legislature today. It would remove judges from the process, which is worrying some opponents.