WKMS Press Releases

nationaldayoflistening.org

Join us on The National Day of Listening, November 29, for a special broadcast of the oral history project Preserving Our Voices, airing during the noon hour of Sounds Good. In the month of October, WKMS staff members met at participating libraries with people from our region at who had stories to record and preserve. We've captured some of the highlights from these recordings and will present them to you the day after Thanksgiving. Hear some of the stories that make our home unique. 

Underwriter Spotlight: CFSB

Oct 22, 2013

It's definitely a treat this Halloween to celebrate our fifth year of underwriting support from CFSB! A community bank, CFSB employees are both team members and part owners with an interest in making the bank the best it can be for both themselves and future generations.

Back in the 1980s, The Black Cats Jump was a thirteen part series of hour-long programs on big band music with host Bobby Bryan and co-producer Mark Welch. The series featured some of the great black big band leaders, sidemen, vocalists, and arrangers. The first show aired live on Friday, October 3, 1980. Dr. Todd Hill and Mark Welch revisit the series for special airings Tuesdays at 9 p.m. during Cafe Jazz, starting September 17. Cafe Jazz hosts George Eldred and Todd Hill talk about the program and how they re-mastered the series with Mark Welch.

Participate in our special oral history project! Meet WKMS staff at participating public libraries and record your story for your family and for future generations. Many of these stories will air on WKMS on Friday, November 29, The National Day of Listening, on Sounds Good. And we’ll mail you a CD recording of your story in December for you to keep. To accommodate everyone we’ll limit recording sessions to 25 minutes.

See examples and more on StoryCorps'website.

A write-up about the event in the Kentucky New Era.

Mark your calendar for these dates and times:

The greatest gift for supporting WKMS is continued service of the quality programming you enjoy. Thank you for making a financial contribution to this station. 

Thank you all for achieving the WKMS fundraising goal during the Halloween edition of Sounds Good! Everything you hear on WKMS happens because of your giving. We thank volunteers, student interns, food and thank you gift providers, Rotarian partners, guests on air, and you for coming through once again. WKMS can't do without you!

Stay tuned... we're giving away five pairs of tickets to Here Come The Mummies. They're performing in Lovett Auditorium on November 21st at 8 pm! We'll announce the winners very soon!

New to the WKMS schedule Wednesdays at 6:30 pm, hear The Treatment hosted by Elvis Mitchell, produced by KCRW, a conversational program about movies, popular art, and entertainment. Beginning in September, NPR's Latino USA with Maria Hinojosa turns into a one-hour program, which WKMS will not be carrying at this time. KET's Connections with Renee Shaw, which previously aired Wednesdays at 6:30 pm, moves to a new date and time: Tuesdays at 6:30 pm.

From the show's website:

Join us on Labor Day for a special program featuring highlights from the ROMP music festival in Owensboro! Hear performances featuring Doyle Lawson, The Deadly Gentlemen, Della Mae, The SteelDrivers, and David Wax Museum. This show will preempt Sounds Good on Monday, September 2, at 11 am. See more at rompfest.com.

Listen to a special Piano Jazz tribute Monday, September 2 at 9 pm, remembering host Marian McPartland. For more than thirty years, composer and pianist Marian McPartland brought jazz into the homes of public radio listeners through her interviews and duets with some of the greatest musicians in the world. She composed piano pieces that have entered the jazz repertoire and songs—with lyrics by such stars as Johnny Mercer, Sammy Cahn, and Peggy Lee—that are considered part of the Great American Songbook. This program is hosted by Marian’s longtime friend Murray Horowitz and features Marian’s original compositions.

Debuting Sunday, September 1 at 9 am

The words "Kentucky Coal" often summon images of the blackened faces of miners emerging from the dark pits of the eastern mountains. In fact, coal mining in the Commonwealth began long before, in the Western Coal Fields of the 1820s. Ever since, from the first mines of McLean's Drift Bank in Muhlenberg County, to the massive operations beneath many western counties, coal has been a major part of our region's life, its politics, and its economy. 

Made possible with the underwriting support of Jennmar.

Pages