INTRODUCING: The WKMS Short Storytelling Contest

Aug 15, 2016
Microphone Photo: Image Credit: By Lucasbosch (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Do you have a story to tell?

Welcome to the WKMS Short Storytelling Competition!

Entrants submit a written short story accompanied with an audio recording. The story length should be between  5 to 10 minutes.   Keep reading for a tutorial on how to use your smart phone to record yourself, or you can call the station at 1-800-599-4737 for more assistance on how to record.

The story must be original and FCC clean (meaning no profanities).

EDIT 11:25 a.m.: WKMS is again on-air.  We apologize for the interruption and the inconvenience.

WKMS is off the air currently due to a power outage in our studios.  We will be back on-air as soon as possible.  We apologize for any inconvenience


Murray State President Bob Davies has named Chad Lampe as the new station manager of WKMS, effective February 1, 2016. Lampe served as the WKMS news director since 2007 and as interim station manager during the national search for the position.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

The first WKMS Community Advisory Board meeting of 2016 is Monday, January 11 at 6 p.m. on the 8th floor of the Fine Arts building on Murray State's campus. There will be data comparing this fiscal year to past years, as well as a discussion on ways to engage new listeners with WKMS in 2016. All are welcome.

Feel free to come and share your thoughts about WKMS for 2016!

Dana Hopkins

After a whirlwind All Things Considered and a rush through the first half of Marketplace, on Wednesday, September 30, WKMS listeners have reached goal, ending yet another pledge drive early, raising over $125,000 in community support!

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

It's been quite a week. In the past 5 days, you've raised over $100,000 for WKMS programming!

That means we're less than $23,000 away from meeting our goal for necessary broadcast expenses and ending this entire fundraiser.

So we think you've earned a little break. We'll be going silent today, giving you your Sunday programs free of interruption. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

WKMS-FM, Murray State’s NPR station, is proud to announce the “Kate B. Lochte Transmission Fund.” A quiet campaign to honor the station’s retiring manager began in June. The fund, to be used for equipment and infrastructure needs, was unveiled to a crowd of friends, listeners, donors and a surprised Lochte during a retirement reception Monday, August 31. 

[Audio, Slideshow] Thank You Kate

Sep 1, 2015
Matt Markgraf, WKMS

WKMS is saying goodbye to our fearless leader, station manager Kate Lochte. Kate has been with WKMS since 1989 and as station manager since 1992. She has been a tremendous leader for this station that has shown exponential growth on all fronts. Thanks, Kate for your service to this station and its members and listeners. Here is a short montage of some great "Kate" moments on air, all the best for your retirement.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Today WKMS celebrates 45 years of memories, music, news and driveway moments. It was 3:28 p.m. on May 11, 1970 when the station went on air with the National Anthem from Murray State's campus. Back then the broadcast day was eight hours long and the coverage area was limited to western Kentucky with just 13,000 watts of power. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte is joined in the studio by Murray State University Library's Wesley Bolin, who discovered some of of the articles about WKMS' first day on the air while researching another project. Also in studio is George Cumbee of Paducah, who was one of the first staff members of WKMS, and present when the station signed on the air, in 1970.

WKMS-FM celebrates forty-five years of broadcasting. Today’s listeners, staff, volunteer show hosts and student interns who make WKMS thrive owe a great debt to the individuals who laid the groundwork for a University radio station back in 1964 and who brought the idea of the station to fruition on May 11, 1970.

During the opening ceremonies in 1970 the station went on air from Murray State’s campus with a broadcast of the National Anthem. One of the first voices heard on the station was Murray State President Harry M. Sparks who remarked, “Today Murray State University has reached another milestone. With the inauguration of radio broadcasting on WKMS-FM, we lengthen the shadow and multiply the sphere of influence of this university.” Back then the broadcast day was eight hours long and the coverage area was limited to western Kentucky with just 13,000 watts of power.