Wickliffe Mounds

Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site is working to promote tourism with four new billboards, which provide visitors with directional, interpretive, and historical information. 

Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site / Facebook

Over 700 years ago, before the time of Daniel Boone and even Columbus, a community of ancient Native Americans thrived in a network of villages lining the Mississippi River. This weekend, children and adults alike can glimpse into that past at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site with a Mississippian Culture Gorget (pronounced 'gor-jet') Workshop. Park Manager Carla Hildebrand and Park Programmer Jessica Crisp speak with Kate on Sounds Good about the workshop and guided tour this Saturday.

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Mounds and Priests, Cathedrals and Popes... Unlock the secrets of the Wickliffe Mounds in a presentation by archaeologist Dr. Kit Wesler at the McCracken County Public Library's Evenings Upstairs program tomorrow night (July 24) at 7. We get a preview on Sounds Good.

 Seymour Bluffs is an American Bald Eagle who travels back in time to an Illini Indian village located along the Mississippi River and helps the natives resolve a problem with the mysterious Piasa Bird in the children's book by author Phyllis Bechtold. On Sounds Good, Kate speaks with Bechtold about her upcoming presentation on May 31 at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site, and the life-sized Seymour Bluffs who will be on-hand to help Bechtold autograph her books for sale in this children's event.

Hear the Conversation:

Native Americans now called Mississippian culture lived at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers around 1100 to 1350 AD. Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site offers a window on this ancient community. Park Manager Carla Hildebrand spoke with Kate Lochte about this season's opening, Tuesday, April 1. 


This past week, hundreds gathered at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site to close a chapter in the Native American history of our region.  They witnessed a ceremony honoring the reburial of the remains of Mississippian-era mound builders who lived in our area almost a thousand years ago.  For over 50 years, the owners of the land that now makes up the historic site displayed them as part of a tourist attraction called Ancient Buried City.