Wet Dry Vote

Toni Blay, Flickr Commons

Update: County Clerk Lynn Lane says Barlow's alcohol ordinance has passed 114 to 41, making it the first wet Ballard County community. 

In McCracken County, 67 voters said yes to alcohol sales while 66 voted no. 

Marion By-the-Drink Alcohol Vote Fails

Mar 23, 2016

UPDATE: Marion residents have voted to keep their city dry after a special election Tuesday night.

Only 298 votes were cast against legalizing by-the-drink alcohol sales, but that was enough to best the 245 in favor.

dotshock, 123rf Stock Photo

The Graves County Clerk’s Office is in the process of validating around 1,300 petition signatures turned in to bring a referendum on alcohol sales within Mayfield city limits.


Supporters of a wet/dry special election in Graves County and Mayfield appear to be changing their petitioning strategy ahead of projected light voter turnout in Tuesday’s General Election.

dotshock, 123rf Stock Photo

 After Marshall County voters approved countywide liquor sales last month, city and county governments are trying to finalize their alcohol ordinances so that sales can begin.

dotshock, 123rf Stock Photo

Around 400 of the needed 650 signatures have been collected in Mayfield for a city-wide alcohol sales referendum. Meanwhile, more than 2,000 signatures have been collected toward a referendum for all of Graves County.

Wikimedia Commons/Steve Snodgrass

Marshall County judge-executive Chyrill Miller has signed an executive order authorizing a special election after 3,366 residents signed a petition in support of legalizing alcohol sales in the county. That number meets the required 25 percent of voters in last year’s general election.

The referendum is now set to take place Tuesday, July 28.


A wet-dry vote for McCracken County’s Maxon Road precinct has been postponed after officials examined the petition calling for the vote and found it was five signatures short. The county’s Deputy Judge Executive Doug Harnice says 323 valid signatures were necessary for the vote that was scheduled for May 7.

“I looked at the signatures on all of them, and found that some didn’t have the last name in it and some didn’t have a telephone, address and some of them were actually in another precinct,” he said.

Lyon County residents approved alcohol sales in a countywide wet/dry vote yesterday. It is the latest in a string of alcohol sales referendums in west Kentucky’s dry patches. County Judge Executive Wade White says people have been quick to take advantage of the county’s new wet status.


Princeton’s city council voted last night to pass the second reading of their new alcohol ordinance. Mayor Gayle Cherry says applications will now be accepted for the city’s two available liquor store licenses. She says it will be at least a couple of months before the stores open. City residents voted in August to go wet. The proposed measure allows businesses to sell alcohol from 7 a.m. to midnight, except on Sunday. Liquor stores may not be located within 1,000 feet of a school or within 200 feet of a church.