water

KENTUCKY OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL

Kentucky's Attorney General said he's going to investigate the operations and management of a troubled water district.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

The U.S. Department of Energy is enhancing its treatment of contaminated groundwater at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site.

CAYUSA / FLICKR (CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE)

After reports of yellow water in the City of Hickman, state officials says residents are safe to drink the water.

HELMUT SEISENBERGER, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

  Kentucky officials said local water district commissioners are now required to get their initial training through the state's Public Service Commission.

PUBLIC DOMAIN, WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Gov. Matt Bevin and Congressman Hal Rogers this weekend announced plans for a $3.4 million water project in eastern Kentucky.  In all, more than $4.5 million will go to address long standing problems in one Appalachian community.

California regulators say Nestle may have to stop collecting a large portion of the water it bottles from the San Bernardino National Forest, because it lacks the legal permits for millions of gallons of water. Nestle sells the water under the Arrowhead label.

The State Water Board says that of the 62.6 million gallons of water that Nestle says it extracted from the San Bernardino spring each year on average from 1947 to 2015, the company may only have a right to some 8.5 million gallons. Those numbers come from a nearly two-year investigation.

Researchers have come up with a new way to extract water from thin air. Literally.

This isn't the first technology that can turn water vapor in the atmosphere into liquid water that people can drink, but researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California, Berkeley, say their approach uses less power and works in drier environments.

As President Trump promises major investment in infrastructure, people across the country are hoping that includes spending on water pipes for drinking.

Flint, Mich., was a high-profile example of the many communities — like one in Eastern Kentucky — where people just can't trust their water.

Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection

As Kentucky regulators and utilities are pushing to loosen regulations on the state’s coal ash ponds and landfills, more pollution problems are emerging at one of the sites in central Kentucky. Erica Peterson of Louisville Public Media reports.

screenshot, via Marshall County Daily via Youtube

  A long-running issue in Marshall County made itself present again at a recent fiscal court meeting when a concerned citizen asked for access to cleaner water.

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