Tim Longmeyer

WFPL

A former high-ranking Kentucky official who will soon begin serving prison time for bribery must also pay a $5,000 fine after settling 45 counts of ethics violations with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission.

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Former Personnel Cabinet secretary Tim Longmeyer has been sentenced to 70 months in prison for federal bribery charges. He will also have to pay $203,500 in restitution.

J. Tyler Franklin/Louisville Public Media

Attorney General Andy Beshear still hasn’t returned contributions to his campaign account that came from Tim Longmeyer, a state Democratic Party insider who admitted to bribery charges earlier this year.

A former high-ranking Kentucky official is due in court for sentencing on his bribery conviction.

Tim Longmeyer pleaded guilty in April to using his influence as head of Kentucky's Personnel Cabinet to steer contracts to a public relations firm in 2014 and 2015. Longmeyer admitted to receiving more than $200,000 in kickbacks.

Longmeyer's sentencing is set for Thursday afternoon in federal court in Lexington.

WFPL

Tim Longmeyer, a former state official who pled guilty to taking bribes, has requested a delay on his sentencing hearing scheduled for August 18.

The prosecutor assigned to the case, Asst. U.S. Attorney Andrew Boone, has also requested a delay, citing a scheduling conflict.

WFPL

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear has appointed a special prosecutor to handle the case against his former deputy.

Former Deputy Attorney General Tim Longmeyer pleaded guilty to a federal bribery charge last month. 

WFPL

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear says a former top deputy in his office will face state charges. Tim Longmeyer has already pleaded guilty to a federal bribery charge.

WFPL

In the wake of former Kentucky official Tim Longmeyer’s admission of accepting bribes while running a state agency, one central question remains unanswered:

Who paid the bribes?

WFPL

Former Personnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer has pleaded guilty to bribery charges in a deal with the U.S. Attorney’s office.

Longmeyer admitted to receiving nearly $200,000 in cash from a consulting firm in exchange for shepherding state business to the company over the course of 2014 and 2015.

WFPL

Months before he was criminally charged with taking bribes for steering state business to a Lexington consulting firm, former Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer joined the long list of so-called “double-dippers” rejoining the state payroll while receiving retirement benefits.

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