Thanksgiving

Food waste is a huge problem globally — starting with our own refrigerators. Over this Thanksgiving week, Americans will throw out almost 200 million pounds of turkey alone, according to figures from the Natural Resources Defense Council.

But before you toss that bird, read on. We asked Massimo Bottura, one of the world's best chefs, to help us figure out what to do with our holiday leftovers.

The roast turkey and pecan pie may be the same as always, but growing numbers of families plan to add a tradition to their Thanksgiving holiday this week: a frank talk about their wishes for end-of-life care.

Paul Malley, president of Aging with Dignity, the agency behind Five Wishes, a popular living will template, says requests for the documents that guide decisions surrounding serious illness and death typically surge starting now.

It's only 9 a.m. on the Friday before Thanksgiving, but there's already a line at Magee's Bakery in Lexington, Ky., filled with people holding dense, sugary pies they've pulled from the bakery shelves.

Greg Higgins, the president and head baker at Magee's, says a rush for Kentucky transparent pies is pretty typical at this time of year.

"This is a standard thing for us to do because of the number of people who are from Maysville — because that's where the transparent name comes from, in that region," Higgins says.

Most Americans don't want their family members to pass along their political opinions while passing the turkey and dressing this Thanksgiving.

According to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, 58 percent of people celebrating the holiday are dreading having to talk politics around the dinner table. Just 31 percent said they were eager to discuss the latest news with their family and friends, while 11 percent are unsure.

If you're gluten-free, you may turn up your nose at Aunt Betsey's macaroni and cheese. And what if you've got a vegan teenager in the family who'd like the Thanksgiving feast to be turkey-free?

A poll from the University of Michigan finds that for families with a picky eater or someone on a special diet, holiday meals can be tricky.

With enough divisive topics to go around the Thanksgiving table this year, dinner debates can easily steal our attention away from loved ones. StoryCorps suggests using its app to have a meaningful, one-on-one conversation, as part of its Great Thanksgiving Listen project, where kids interview their elders about their lives. But anyone with a smartphone can participate.

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    During the Thanksgiving season, words like 'gratitude' and 'thankfulness' are seen at every turn. However, the holiday season can often carry stressful, and even negative, connotations. MSU Psychology professor, Dr. Michael Bordieri, visits Sounds Good to discuss the psychological benefits of gratitude in every day life, and how important it is to focus on the positive. 

Sarah Jane Sanders

Candy, candy canes, candy corn and syrup. Those are the four basic food groups according to Buddy the Elf. And this time of year, the gluttonous season, it seems like he is onto something.

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  Think twice before giving pets bones to chew on during holiday meals. Licensed Veterinary Technician Racheal Shultz of the Murray Animal Hospital said to avoid giving pets any part of the meal, all together. Shultz said the biggest problem she encounters during the holidays is pets suffering from digestive problems after their owner slipped them food from the table.

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The Kentucky Office of Highway Safety is reminding holiday travelers to be sure and buckle up for every trip.

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