tennessee

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As the Tennessee General Assembly adjourned for the year on Friday, here is a look at some of the winning and losing legislation from this year's session.

WINNERS: 

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The Tennessee Valley Authority and the Department of the Navy broke ground Friday on a project in western Tennessee that will eventually be the state’s largest solar facility.

The ceremony was held in conjunction with Earth Day. Construction won't begin in earnest until sometime next year at the Shelby County site, north of Memphis,  which will cover 400 acres with 580,000 solar panels.

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College and university faculty and staff in Tennessee may soon be able to arm themselves with handguns on campuses. The Tennessee state Senate passed the measure Tuesday 28 to 5. 

Two Tennessee lawmakers are calling for a federal investigation into the arrest of at least five elementary school children.

According to the Daily News Journal in Murfreesboro, the children, who ranged in age from 6 to 10, were handcuffed and taken to a juvenile detention center because they failed to stop a fight that happened away from school property.

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The Tennessee General Assembly has passed legislation that would allow Tennesseans to register to vote online.

One week after he formally received a bill to designate the Bible as Tennessee's state book, Gov. Bill Haslam has vetoed the measure. Critics say the bill isn't constitutional — and that it equates the Bible to the Tennessee walking horse or the Tennessee cave salamander.

The bill's backers are pledging to try to override the veto, which comes a year after similar legislation failed.

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Tennessee lawmakers have approved a nearly $35 billion annual spending plan for the budget year beginning July 1, sending the measure to Gov. Bill Haslam's desk.

Tenn. Lawmaker Exiled Over 'Continuing Risk' to Women

Apr 7, 2016
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A Tennessee lawmaker is effectively being quarantined from lawmakers, lobbyists and interns after the state's attorney general determined that he could pose a risk to "unsuspecting women" at the state Capitol complex. 

In what is believed to be a first, the Bible could be adopted as a symbol of Tennessee, after the Legislature narrowly approved a bill designating "the Holy Bible as the official state book." The measure now goes to Gov. Bill Haslam.

"Critics called the proposal both unconstitutional and sacrilegious," Nashville Public Radio reports. "They also pointed out there are many versions of the Bible, none of which are specified in the resolution."

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A bill to have Tennessee state lawmakers fill U.S. Senate vacancies has been defeated. 

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