The number of teens abusing drugs is lower than it's been since the 1990s, according to a national survey.

"In particular, we see a tremendous decline in the portion of young people using cigarettes," Dr. Lloyd Johnson, a study researcher at the University of Michigan, said at a press conference on Thursday. "The changes we're seeing are very large and very important."

A study published Tuesday in the journal Clinical Psychological Science finds that increased time spent with popular electronic devices — whether a computer, cell phone or tablet — might have contributed to an uptick in symptoms of depression and suicidal thoughts over the last several years among teens, especially among girls.

In the midst of an opioid epidemic that continues to devastate families, a sliver of hope has arrived. Two long-term studies published Monday show that opioid use among teens and opioid poisonings among younger children are on the decline.

From NPR: Testy teenagers are nothing new. But a therapist is encouraging parents to not take it personally and hold back from lashing out in anger. The solution to fights with your never-in-by-curfew, texting-at-the-table adolescent is get to the source of their anger or embarassment, not just pile yours on top of it.

The death of a 14-year-old Christian County girl has sparked a movement against bullying and suicide. The movement started this month after Miranda Campbell fatally shot herself. Angela Felty is the director of the Elevation Teen Center in Hopkinsville. She says she started the movement with help from youths who attend the center. She says the Miranda Campbell Challenge has a Facebook page and had more than 1,000 "likes" from users just a few days after being set up. Felty and Campbell's father say the teen was bullied because she was bisexual.