tariffs

Nicole Erwin, Ohio Valley ReSource

 

Dozens of Tennessee farmers have urged the state's U.S. House delegation to oppose President Donald Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs, saying they worry the fallout will cripple the rural state's agriculture.

Ryland Barton, Kentucky Public Radio

This week in Kentucky politics: the lawsuit over the new pension law was argued in court; Kentucky’s new commissioner of education laid out his priorities, which include helping charter schools open up and taking over Louisville’s public school system; and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell continued to express concern about President Trump’s tariffs leading to a full-blown trade war.

Listen to this week’s edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled in the player above.

As the world's largest economy, the United States can use its considerable economic muscle to force other countries into making concessions in trade disputes.

But as President Trump is finding out, even the biggest guy on the block can face resistance by pushing too hard.

The finance ministers from the six non-U.S. members of the G-7 issued a statement Saturday criticizing the trade actions taken by the Trump administration.

The U.S. announced Thursday that it would extend tariffs — 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminum — to Canada, Mexico and the European Union, citing national security concerns as the main reason for implementation.

Ryland Barton, WFPL, cropped

The Senate's top leader is usually a powerful ally of President Donald Trump, but he finds himself at odds with his fellow Republican over slapping tariffs on American allies.

President Trump is weighing new protections for domestic automakers, saying American auto workers have "waited long enough."

Trump met Wednesday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and instructed him to consider an investigation into possible tariffs on imported vehicles and auto parts.

A similar investigation launched last year resulted in a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum, although in many cases those tariffs have been suspended while the U.S. negotiates with exporting countries.

Rebecca Kiger

Glynis Board with the Ohio Valley ReSource visits a rural community in Puerto Rico to see how a West Virginian businessman is trying to bring light to their dark times.

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

With more than 220 steel and aluminum facilities in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, the Ohio Valley has a lot riding on the Trump administration’s taxes on imported metals. One of the nation’s largest remaining aluminum producers is betting big that the president will follow through with tariffs. 

The Trump administration has decided to hold off on imposing most of its tariffs on imported steel and aluminum until at least June 1.

Tariffs were scheduled to take effect at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday on imports from Canada, the largest U.S. supplier of steel and aluminum, as well as Mexico, Argentina, Australia, Brazil and the EU.

A source familiar with the decision says the administration has reached an agreement in principle with Australia, Argentina and Brazil, which may avoid the need for tariffs against those countries altogether.

In the latest in a bitter trade dispute between the U.S. and China, Beijing on Tuesday said it would impose anti-dumping duties on imports of U.S. sorghum.

China's Commerce Ministry says it will force U.S. sorghum exporters to pay a temporary 178.6 percent "deposit," which will act as a tariff on the cereal grain that is used in China as feed for cattle and as a sweetener in many products, including baijiu, a popular Chinese liquor.

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