suicide prevention

Every day, thousands of teens attempt suicide in the U.S. — the most extreme outcome for the millions of children in this country who struggle with mental health issues.

As we've reported all week, schools play a key role, along with parents and medical professionals, in identifying children who may be at risk of suicide. And one of the biggest challenges: myths that can cloud their judgment.

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Suicide rates are highest between the months of April and August according to the Annenberg Public Policy Center’s analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Research director Dan Romer says the analysis debunks the myth of higher suicide rates during end-of-year holidays.

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There's limited data that shows why people suffer from depression over the holidays, but one can reasonably assume that it's often a time where people who already feel isolated may feel more isolated, or see others who are more socially connected. Suicide prevention is a difficult topic, but an important conversation to have. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Murray State Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Michael Bordieri on ways to reach out and help people who may be struggling and some of the warning signs that might be displayed.

Suicides among Kentucky veterans and active military service members have increased the past several years. In many cases, those who have died never sought help through the Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

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Tragic human losses stemming from depression inspire us to learn more about the illness with Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about what depression looks like and when to seek treatment.

Listen to the first part of our series: Understanding Depression, Myths, Causes, Treatments

From NPR: There's no magic elixir for healthy aging, but here's one more thing to add to the list: good gut health.

A Middle Tennessee mom is leading the charge to get 10,000 signatures on a suicide prevention petition.  Cindy Johnson told The Leaf Chronicle that her goal is to raise awareness of suicide in an effort to prevent it.