Steel

Nicole Erwin, Ohio Valley ReSource

 

Dozens of Tennessee farmers have urged the state's U.S. House delegation to oppose President Donald Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs, saying they worry the fallout will cripple the rural state's agriculture.

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

With more than 220 steel and aluminum facilities in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, the Ohio Valley has a lot riding on the Trump administration’s taxes on imported metals. One of the nation’s largest remaining aluminum producers is betting big that the president will follow through with tariffs. 

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

Newly enacted U.S. tariffs on aluminum and steel imports have sparked a sharp reaction from around the globe, with several nations warning of an all-out trade war.

President Trump on Thursday made good on a promise to impose a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports. The levies are to go into effect in 15 days.

Updated at 4:47 p.m. ET

President Trump ordered steep tariffs on imported steel and aluminum from every country except Canada and Mexico. It's the boldest move to date for the president who campaigned on a protectionist platform that is sharply at odds with Republicans' free trade orthodoxy.

When President Trump announced plans to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports last week, he made clear he views a healthy steel industry as vital to the economic and military success of the United States.

But the industry is under threat from steelmakers in competing countries, especially China, which has emerged as by far the largest and most powerful producer on earth.

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

Update:

President Trump met with steel and aluminum industry leaders Thursday to talk about implementing tariffs on metal imports. The Ohio Valley is home to one of the last US aluminum smelters and many industries depend on steel and aluminum. The president indicated steep tariffs will come sometime next week.

As the Trump administration sees it, U.S. steel and aluminum industries are in crisis, rapidly losing ground to foreign competitors and hemorrhaging jobs along the way.

But proposed import tariffs and quotas have other manufacturers worried that they'll become less competitive in the global marketplace.

How the administration responds to the problem is something Mark Vaughn is watching very closely.

The Commerce Department on Friday recommended setting strict new limits on imported steel and aluminum, saying action is needed to shore up U.S. industries vital to national security.

The recommendations, made after a 10-month investigation, are based on a seldom-used statute that aims to protect critical defense-related businesses.

Steel Mill, Bob Jagendorf, Flickr Commons (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Steel makers and manufacturers around the Ohio Valley are waiting for a report from the Trump administration that could trigger higher tariffs on imported steel and bring mixed results for a region that still has strong ties to the industry.

David Benbennick, Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

A steel company in northern Kentucky is investing $176 million in a new project line creating 75 jobs.

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