Society

The day Ayden came home from school with bruises, his mother started looking for a new school.

Ayden's a bright 9-year-old with a blond crew cut, glasses and an eager smile showing new teeth coming in. He also has autism, ADHD and a seizure disorder. (We're not using his last name to protect his privacy.) He loves karate, chapter books and very soft blankets: "I love the fuzziness, I just cocoon myself into my own burrito."

"He's so smart but lacks so much socially," says his mother, Lynn.

Kentucky State Parks via Facebook

Kentucky officials are warning boaters about a danger known as electric shock drowning.

When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who has already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Discovery Park of America

The Discovery Park of America in northwest Tennessee opened a half-million dollar Children’s Discovery Garden Tuesday.

via Beth Roberts

The Hopkinsville Parks and Recreation Department is installing four ‘Little Free Libraries’ around town in an effort to promote literacy.

Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission, via Facebook

The Lexington Human Rights Commission is asking the state supreme court to hear its case against a local print store. 

wklzzz, 123rf Stock Photo

Gov. Bill Haslam is headed to West Tennessee to sign a bill seeking to make it easier for rural areas to get access to the internet.

LRC Public Information

The Secretary of Kentucky’s Justice and Public Safety Cabinet says he’s thrilled with the impact of the state’s needle exchange programs.

Kentucky State Police

Kentucky State Police Post 1 held services for fallen soldiers on Monday as part of National Police Officer Memorial Day. 

African-Americans experience a significant drop in their blood pressure after they move out of highly segregated neighborhoods and into more integrated neighborhoods, researchers report Monday.

A study involving more than 2,000 African-Americans found that those who moved from the most-segregated neighborhoods to less-segregated neighborhoods later experienced lower systolic blood pressure, a factor in heart attacks and strokes.

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