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The wife of a northwest Tennessee man killed in the Las Vegas shooting last October victim has set up a foundation in his name and is collecting donations for projects, including one to protect against school shootings.

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Even though his actually birthday is not until March 2, the Calloway County Public Library will kick off the festivities for Dr. Seuss's birthday Wednesday.

American Red Cross, West Kentucky Chapter Facebook Page

  The American Red Cross is assisting in recovery efforts in Hopkinsville following the storms that impacted the area on Saturday.


The Kentucky clerk who was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples has written a book.

Courtesy of the City of Paducah, Facebook

Paducah city crews are installing the floodgates that protect the city from the rising Ohio River.

High school students across the United States have been leading the call for more gun control since the school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

Some have called them the "voice of a generation on gun control" that may be able to turn the tide of a long-simmering debate.

After last week's shooting in Parkland, Fla., calls to arm teachers and school personnel have intensified. Both President Trump and the National Rifle Association argued this week that enabling school officials to shoot back could save lives and could deter potential assailants from entering a school.

Trump has clarified that he believes only those "adept" at using firearms should be armed, not all teachers.

What would our schools really be like if teachers carried guns in their classrooms? If, as President Trump first suggested at this week's White House meeting with families who have suffered school shootings, 20 percent of teachers were armed?

He repeated the idea in tweets the next day, saying, "20% of teachers, a lot, would now be able to ... immediately fire back if a savage sicko came to a school with bad intentions ... Far more assets at much less cost than guards. A 'gun free' school is a magnet for bad people. ATTACKS WOULD END!"


A multi-county outbreak of Hepatitis A remains ongoing with the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) now reporting 117 cases.

The chemical BPA isn't living up to its nasty reputation.

A two-year government study of rats found that even high doses of the plastic additive produced only "minimal effects," and that these effects could have occurred by chance.

The finding bolsters the Food and Drug Administration's 2014 assessment that water bottles and other products containing BPA are not making people sick.