Society

Cristinistor, 123rf Stock Photo

A wastewater plant in Crittenden County is inching towards construction.

Sleek, high-tech wristbands are extremely popular these days, promising to measure heart rate, steps taken during the day, sleep, calories burned and even stress.

WKMS File Photo

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is holding a ceremony Tuesday to name a bridge near Kentucky Dam after a resident engineer who died last year. 

Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network via Facebook

A new report shows that suicides in Tennessee are increasing with middle-aged people being most at risk.

Twenty percent of children who were in a car crash where someone died were not buckled in properly or were not wearing a seat belt at all, a study finds, as were 43 percent of children who died themselves.

And child fatality rates in deadly car crashes vary widely by state.

Juan Pablo Gonzalez, 123rf Stock Photo

A family court judge in Kentucky is being told he has to decide whether to recuse himself in gay adoption requests on a case-by-case basis.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center via Facebook

Vanderbilt University Medical Center officials are warning that doctors are already treating numerous people injured in accidents involving all-terrain vehicles and it's not even the peak trauma season of summer yet.

One in eight Americans — 42 million people — still struggles to get enough to eat. And while that number has been going down recently, hunger appears to be getting worse in some economically distressed areas, especially in rural communities.

Food banks that serve these areas are also feeling the squeeze, as surplus food supplies dwindle but the lines of people seeking help remain long.

A Mississippi lawmaker apologized Monday for saying the Louisiana leaders who supported the recent removal of four Confederate monuments "should be LYNCHED!" Karl Oliver, a GOP state representative, had made the comment in a Facebook post this weekend.

Here is the original statement:

The NAACP, America's oldest civil rights group, is replacing its president, Cornell William Brooks, and planning a "transformational retooling," according to the group's board of directors.

Brooks, who has been the president of the NAACP for three years, will not be retained once his contract is up at the end of June, the chairman and vice chair of the board of directors say.

The NAACP says the change is part of "an organization-wide refresh."

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