Society

Rebecca Kiger

We’ve heard the statistics on the region’s heroin crisis, and how many have fallen into addiction. But one person’s story can tell a lot about what it takes to get out. As part of an occasional series on the Affordable Care Act, the Ohio Valley ReSource explores how the law expanded substance abuse treatment for thousands, including Wendy Crites. Producers Glynis Board and Rebecca Kiger bring us the story of Crites’ struggle for sobriety, told in her own words.

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The Kentucky Heritage Council is seeking nominations for historic preservation awards.

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Kentuckians headed to tropical locales for spring break are being reminded to take precautions against the Zika virus. Travelers are advised to prevent mosquito bites and unprotected sexual contact if venturing to areas where the Zika virus has been identified.

The world is facing its greatest humanitarian crisis since 1945, says the United Nations humanitarian coordinator, Stephen O'Brien.

O'Brien told the U.N. Security Council on Friday that more than 20 million people across four countries in Africa and the Middle East are at risk of starvation and famine.

"We stand at a critical point in our history," he said. "Without collective and coordinated global efforts, people will simply starve to death."

US Army Corps of Engineers

Kentucky is receiving mixed reviews in a new report card looking at the nation’s aging infrastructure. The report was issued Thursday by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Fulton County Sheriff's Office

Third Afternoon Update:

The National Weather Service Paducah confirms two tornadoes struck Fulton County Thursday night. In a series of Tweets, NWS said the first tornado was an EF1 that traveled 8 miles north of Hickman to five miles southeast of Hickman with peak winds of 110 mph. The second tornado was an EF2 east of Hickman that traveled to the Tennessee border. This tornado peaked at 125 mph.

Back in 2011, Alabama passed what was then considered the nation's strictest immigration law. Much of it was later struck down by the courts.

Now, the law offers a snapshot of potential challenges ahead for the Trump administration.

For Fernanda Herrera, a senior at Samford University outside Birmingham, Ala., the current climate surrounding immigration has her scared, just as the Alabama law did in 2011.

"I don't know if I'm going to see my parents tomorrow," Herrera says.

Her father crossed the Mexican border illegally when she was two.

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Kentucky once again ranks next-to-last in a national survey of well-being.

An estimated 11 million immigrants live and work in the United States illegally. Their fate is one of the big policy questions facing the country. The story of how that population grew so large is a long one that's mostly about Mexico, and full of unintended consequences.

Prior to the 1920s, the U.S. had few restrictions on immigration, save for a few notable exclusions.

"Basically, people could show up," says Jeffrey Passel, of the Pew Research Center.

For workers in Mexico, crossing into the U.S. made a lot of economic sense, then and now.

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Soldiers in the 101st Aviation Regiment dubbed ‘Archangels’ return from Afghanistan this week. 

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