SNAP

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Kumar Rashad is worried about his students. Most days, he said, one of his students at Breckinridge Metropolitan High School will tell him they’re hungry.

If Republicans in Congress have their way, millions of people who get food aid through the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) will have to find a job or attend job training classes for about 20 hours each week, or lose their benefits.

Lisa Gillespie, WFPL

On Monday, President Donald Trump released his proposed annual budget, which is a vision for what he wants to see spent and not spent this year. One major change would be to federal funding for food for low-income Americans, which comes through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

The Trump administration is proposing a major shake-up in one of the country's most important "safety net" programs, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps. Under the proposal, most SNAP recipients would lose much of their ability to choose the food they buy with their SNAP benefits.

The proposal is included in the Trump administration budget request for fiscal year 2019. It would require approval from Congress.

The delivery of federal food benefits for millions of low-income people is likely to change after the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it'll allow states more flexibility in how they dole out the money.

LBJ Library/public domain

Law professor Philip Alston is a United Nations expert on extreme poverty. In his position as a U.N. Special Rapporteur  he reports on places where pervasive poverty and human rights issues intersect, places such as Haiti, south Asia and central Africa. His latest work, however, is taking him to parts of the U.S., including the Ohio Valley.

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Gov. Bill Haslam is reinstating food stamp work requirements for most Tennessee counties starting February 1.

Marek Szucs, 123rf Stock Photo

Two Kentucky agencies are among 32 organizations nationwide benefiting from almost $17 million in federal funding to help low income-citizens buy fruits and vegetables. 

Travis Isaacs via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)

Double Dollars is expanding to west Kentucky as two farmers markets in Calloway and Daviess County become eligible for the program.

Robert McGraw, WOUB

The true costs of the deep cuts in President Donald Trump’s proposed budget would fall disproportionately on many of the poor and working class people in the Ohio Valley region who helped to elect him, according to lawmakers and policy analysts.

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