smoking ban

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A call for a smoking ban inside Kentucky’s workplaces and public buildings has the support of the state’s largest business organization. 

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

Mayfield has passed a new city-wide smoking ban in public buildings and restaurants.

The city council approved the ordinance's second reading yesterday 5 to 4.  It passed the first reading last month 6-4. The ordinance is modeled after Paducah’s smoking ban. 

Mayor Teresa Cantrell said the ordinance had been in the works for about 18 months and that it was out of concern for the health of residents as well as employees.

The Mayfield City Council has passed the first reading of a city-wide smoking ban ordinance with a 6-4 vote. Mayor Teresa Cantrell says yesterday’s vote is the first step to ban smoking in public places like restaurants and other businesses.

“We’ve been working on this for a little over a year and we did a community poll and it was overwhelmingly in support,” she says.

The City of Mayfield could possibly ban smoking in public. This comes after a statewide ban failed in the Kentucky House.

Mayor Teresa Cantrell says there’s wide community support for a smoking ban. She says a public survey showed only 2 out of the 70 respondents were against a ban. Cantrell says a smoking ban wouldn’t just benefit a business’s patrons.

Supporters of a statewide smoking ban in Kentucky are once again trying to persuade a House committee to pass the the legislation this session. The House Judiciary Committee is the second committee—after House Health and Welfare—to hear the smoking ban bill sponsored by State Rep. Susan Westrom, a Lexington Democrat.

Legislation that would institute a statewide smoking ban in restaurants and other public places has been sent to the House Judiciary Committee for further review, making it unlikely to pass this legislative session. 

House Speaker Greg Stumbo says he doesn't expect the measure to make it back to the full House for consideration.  The bill has proven divisive in Kentucky, one of the nation's top tobacco-producing states.

Supporters of a statewide smoking ban brought high-profile help from the world of sports while rallying Thursday in the Capitol Rotunda  for their cause.

A new poll shows more than half of Kentuckians interviewed last fall support a state law to ban smoking in indoor public places. The poll from the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and the Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati finds about 6 out of 10 would support such a ban. That’s up from fewer than half of those polled in 2010.  However, the measure isn’t getting much political support because so much of the region depends on tobacco farming.

For the second year in a row, a poll shows a majority of Kentucky favor a statewide smoking ban.

Last year the poll, conducted by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, showed a majority favored a ban for the first time.

Pension reform, updating liquor laws, expanded gaming, a state-wide smoking ban and legalizing the production of industrial hemp are just a few issues Kentucky Public Radio Capitol Bureau Chief Kenny Colston thinks will be on the agenda for this year's legislative session in Frankfort. Colston speaks with Chad Lampe about the details surrounding some of those issues and who will fill  retiring Sen. Ken Winters's (R-Murray) seat on the senate education committee. Plus, hear if there are any hard feeling between  Sen. Bob Leeper (I-Paducah) and Senate President-elect Robert Stivers (R-Manchester) after his failed attempt at seeking the top post in the Senate.