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Overcoming a psychological addiction like alcohol and drug use can be an incredibly difficult process and just as there is a stigma attached to those suffering from illness, there is also a self-stigma and shame from the individuals suffering, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Murray State Psychology faculty member. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about the self-stigma and how basic mindfulness workshops can prevent relapse in those trying to overcome an addiction.

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More Kentuckians are supportive of higher insurance rates for smokers than for those who are obese, according to a new health issues poll.

The Foundation for a Health Kentucky conducted the study which found a majority of non smokers and former smokers agree higher rates are justifiable for smokers.

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Kentucky has one of the highest smoking rates in the country with about 30% of the population using tobacco products in some form. Quitting smoking is becoming ever more relevant to the faculty and staff at Murray State University, now with a new smoking ban going into effect in the next school year. Kate Lochte and Dr. Michael Bordieri of the Murray State University Department of Psychology continue a discussion about quitting tobacco addiction by discussing the pros and cons of using e-cigarettes as an alternative and learning how to "urge surf."

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Quitting smoking is one of the top resolutions people make, coming in only behind weight loss and exercise. The CDC found that over two-thirds of smokers reported a desire to quit and over half tried to go at least one day without the habit in a given year. Murray State Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Michael Bordieri joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to discuss how to kick the nicotine addiction.

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Kentucky is receiving failing grades across the board in a new report from the American Lung Association.

The report criticizes the commonwealth for having one of the lowest tobacco taxes in the nation, as well as poor access to smoking cessation programs.

Kentucky is the 47th healthiest state in the U.S., according to a United Health Foundation report released Thursday.

The state's low marks were attributed to a high prevalence of smoking, a high percentage of childhood poverty and a high rate of preventable hospitalizations, the report said.

Mississippi ranked 50th, followed by Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Hawaii topped the list as the healthiest state in the country. Indiana ranked 37th.

The U.S. adult smoking rate is at an all-time low, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

Even still, Kentucky's smoking rate remains high compared to the rest of the U.S., and state organizations continue to try to gain support for a statewide smoking ban.

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A new report shows Kentucky continues to make strides in reducing the number of babies born premature.  Just over 12 percent of babies in the state last year were born before 37 weeks of pregnancy, which was an improvement for the 7th year in a row. 

The commonwealth earned a “C” on the latest report card from the March of Dimes. Only a few years ago, the state was failing.  Katrina Smith with the Kentucky March of Dimes Chapter credits the improvement to better education.

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Significantly fewer Kentucky  teens are smoking according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control.

In 2011 the CDC found nearly a quarter of high school students in the state used cigarettes but in its most recent report that number dropped to nearly 18 percent. The decline moves Kentucky from the state with the highest rate of teen smokers to the sixth highest.

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According to a new poll, doctors in western Kentucky don’t ask their patients who are smokers if they would like to kick the habit as often as other physicians in the Commonwealth.

The Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky’s Health Issues Poll found 58 percent of all Kentucky smokers were asked by their doctor if they would like information on quitting. The foundation’s  President Susan Zepeda says in western Kentucky the amount dropped to 45 percent.

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