Sleep has a big impact on learning. And not just when you do it in class. Sleep deprivation affects memory, cognition and motivation, and the effects are compounded when it's long-term.

Hey! Wake up! Need another cup of coffee?

Join the club. Apparently about a third of Americans are sleep-deprived. And their employers are probably paying for it, in the form of mistakes, productivity loss, accidents and increased health insurance costs.

There's growing evidence that a lack of sleep can leave the brain vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease.

"Changes in sleep habits may actually be setting the stage" for dementia, says Jeffrey Iliff, a brain scientist at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland.

The brain appears to clear out toxins linked to Alzheimer's during sleep, Iliff explains. And, at least among research animals that don't get enough solid shut-eye, those toxins can build up and damage the brain.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Daylight Savings Time ends Sunday morning at 2 a.m. Remember to set your clocks BACK one hour before you go to bed tonight. Enjoy the extra hour!

Also, remember to change the batteries in your home smoke detectors and make sure your home heating appliances are all set for the chilly months ahead.

The viruses that cause the common cold are always lurking. But consider this: Even if we touch a doorknob or keyboard that's covered in cold germs from an infected person, we don't always catch the cold.

"Sometimes when we're exposed to viruses, we end up not getting sick," says Aric Prather, a psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who studies how our behaviors can influence our health.

How to Get A Good Night's Sleep

May 5, 2015
Antonio Sciacca, 123rf Stock Photo

We sleep because we get tired. That's the prevailing wisdom for why we sleep, but then why do 30% of people report difficulty sleeping at some point in their lifetime? Problems sleeping can have a real cost on productivity and focus during the work day and can be host to many other psychological problems, says Murray State Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Michael Bordieri. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good and shares some solutions through the basic principals of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBTI).

Vesna Cvorovic, 123rf stock photo

As the semester winds down at Murray State and across the region and finals week approaches, the topic of stress may be on the minds of many. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte and Dr. Michael Bordieri of the Murray State University Department of Psychology discuss finding various ways of dealing with stress and how to get a good night's sleep.

Paducah Among Nation's Sleepiest Cities

Aug 14, 2012

The website has ranked Paducah third among the nation’s sleepiest cities. The site got the rankings by analyzing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System. Paducahans averaged 9.6 days of lost sleep each month, and nearly 26 percent reported not getting enough sleep more than half the time.