MSU Photo

Tall, dark-haired and slender, Ray Chumbler IV is a recent magna cum laude graduate of Murray State University in Non-Profit Leadership Studies. He's also been a student ambassador for the Office of Student Disability Services, working to increase an awareness about people who are on the autism spectrum, like he is. He shares his experience living with autism, being diagnosed as a teenager and his hopes for the Ray Chumbler IV Autism Scholarship Endowment scholarship with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good.

Murray State University History Department, Facebook

Murray State's Department of History hosts the The Fourth Annual Beasley Scholarship Banquet, featuring guest speaker Joe Lee, Professor of Irish Studies: Director of the Glucksman Ireland House at New York University. Proceeds benefit the T. Wayne Beasley Memorial History Scholarship. MSU History Department Faculty Member Dr. Bill Mulligan speaks with Kate Lochte about banquet on Sounds Good.

Afternoon Round-Up 5/31/12

May 31, 2012

Today on NPR: While "Five Wives Vodka" is made and sold in Utah, officials in Idaho have decided its name and label might offend both Mormons and women.

Four Rivers Region:

Construction begins next summer on a massive marina and riverfront project in downtown Paducah.

Daviess County Leader on Coal Scholarshi​p Program

May 31, 2012

Daviess County Judge-Executive All Mattingly hopes western Kentucky coal counties will soon be included in a new coal tax college scholarship program. 

Governor Steve Beshear has released four million dollars for scholarships to Eastern Kentucky college students in a move to counteract a legislative stalemate. 

Afternoon Round-Up 5/2/12

May 2, 2012
Davey 88 / wikimedia commons

Today on NPR: Known as "the spray man," 23-year-old Nour Hatem Zahra helped organize protests and spray-painted anti-government slogans around Damascus, the Syrian capital. He died this week after security forces shot him. Hundreds of mourners attended his funeral.


A plan to create scholarships for college students in the Appalachian region is in danger after the Senate removed the funding in its budget proposal.  The scholarship program was intended as a compromise after a bill to move the University of Pikeville into the state university system couldn’t garner enough support.  It would give college juniors and seniors money to attend private universities or public university partnerships in the Appalachian region to finish their education.  The House’s version of the budget funded the scholarships with coal severance tax money, but the Senate remove