Same Sex Marriage

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The Kentucky County Clerks Association has proposed amending Kentucky law so that county clerks don’t have to sign marriage licenses.

The legislation is being crafted so that county clerks who oppose same-sex marriages would be exempted from signing off on them.  

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  A federal judge on Wednesday ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to resume issuing marriage licenses.

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Kentuckians may be changing their minds—very slowly—when it comes to same sex marriage, a new poll suggests.

Governor's Office

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear will attend this year’s Fancy Farm political picnic. 

People have been lining up outside the U.S. Supreme Court for days hoping that they will be among the lucky ones to get a seat for Tuesday's historic arguments on gay marriage.

As of now, gay marriage is legal in 36 states. By the end of this Supreme Court term, either same-sex couples will be able to wed in all 50 states, or gay marriage bans may be reinstituted in many of the states where they've previously been struck down.

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  Kentucky’s case before the Supreme Court started with a conversation between attorneys Shannon Fauver and Dawn Elliott.

As they chatted in Fauver’s Louisville office, the U.S. Supreme Court was considering a challenge to the federal Defense of Marriage Act, a piece of legislation that was an obstacle to same-sex marriage being made legal in the U.S.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears legal arguments next week in the legal battle over same-sex marriage. It's an extraordinarily high-stakes clash, but the men and women at the center of it see themselves as incredibly ordinary. The 12 couples and two widowers include doctors, lawyers, an Army sergeant, nurses and teachers.

Public opinion will flip in favor of same-sex marriage—though it will take time to happen, an attorney who helped lead the legal fight against California’s anti-same-sex union law Proposition 8 said in Louisville this week.

This month, the Bluegrass Poll found opposition to same-sex marriage has grown in Kentucky from 50 percent to 57 percent since last summer.

Speaking at a forum with University of Louisville law students on Tuesday, attorney David Boies said other states have set an example of how acceptance of same-sex marriage will play out in the U.S.

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New polling shows opposition to same sex marriage is growing among Kentucky voters.

According to the most recent Bluegrass Poll, 57 percent of the registered voters surveyed earlier this month said they don’t support same sex marriage. That’s compared to 50 percent last summer.

The American Civil Liberties Union and an attorney from Stanford Law School’s Supreme Court Litigation Clinic have joined the legal team representing Kentucky couples challenging the state’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriage.

The couples on Monday filed a response in support of Governor Steve Beshear’s earlier petition urging the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the case and settle the same-sex marriage matter.

This means both parties want to see the case go before the Supreme Court.