renewable energy

Illinois Sees Increase in Renewable Energy Developments

5 hours ago
Vaclav Volrab, 123rf Stock Photo

 

New state requirements and incentives are drawing renewable energy developers to Illinois.

The 2016 Future Energy Jobs Act requires Illinois utilities to have renewable sources account for 25 percent of their retail power by 2025, The Chicago Tribune reported . The act has an annual budget of more than $200 million to create programs and incentives that encourage solar development.

Federico Rostagno, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky lawmakers are once again considering changing the state’s net metering rules, which allow people to sell electric utilities the extra energy generated from household solar panels or windmills.

Think "renewable energy" and the wind and sun come to mind, but someday it may be possible to add ocean energy to that list.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

Even in what has historically been the country’s coal-fired stronghold, coal’s share of the electricity market is declining. The drop of coal-fired electricity generation in the Southeast — and a corresponding rise in natural gas and renewables — is reflecting what’s happening to the nation as a whole.

Hannu Viitanen, 123rf Stock Photo

The Tennessee Valley Authority and the Department of the Navy broke ground Friday on a project in western Tennessee that will eventually be the state’s largest solar facility.

The ceremony was held in conjunction with Earth Day. Construction won't begin in earnest until sometime next year at the Shelby County site, north of Memphis,  which will cover 400 acres with 580,000 solar panels.

123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky has gotten mixed grades in a nationwide report card of states’ solar energy policies.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

Across the Atlantic Ocean, governments and businesses are taking big steps toward renewable energy. Their transition could provide lessons for Kentucky.

This is the fourth in a five-part series. Read the others here.

In the middle of the industrial German city of Essen, there’s a wall surrounding a property bigger than 100 soccer fields. This is Zollverein: two former coal mines and a coking plant, which is used to turn coal to coke for steelmaking. I’m here to see how a former coal complex has been reinvented over the past two decades into something that’s a genuine tourist attraction.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

Across the Atlantic Ocean, governments and businesses are taking big steps toward renewable energy. Their transition could provide lessons for Kentucky.

This is the third in a five-part series. Read the others here.

For 900 years, ships and goods have been unloaded in Hamburg, Germany’s second-biggest city and an industrial center. On a fall day, tourists stroll along the Landungsbrücken, or floating dock, watching the boats come and go.

Like in Kentucky, manufacturers in Hamburg need to know that they’ll have a large and constant supply of affordable electricity. And two very different power plants in Hamburg show the tension in Germany’s energy market.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

Across the Atlantic Ocean, governments and businesses are taking big steps toward renewable energy. Their transition could provide lessons for Kentucky.

This is the second in a five-part series. Read the others here.

In Western Germany, only a 45-minute drive from the tourists milling around the iconic cathedral in Cologne, miners work in three immense lignite coal mines. Machines rumble, digging the soft, brown coal out of the ground and placing it on conveyor belts.

Erica Peterson | wfpl.org

 Across the Atlantic Ocean, governments and businesses are taking big steps toward renewable energy. Their transition could provide lessons for Kentucky.

This is the first in a five-part series.

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