regulations

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

A nationally recognized educator is advocating for more teacher freedom in their classrooms. Ron Clark is a featured speaker at the annual College and Career Readiness Summit at Murray State University this week. He spoke at a press conference before addressing a packed room in Lovett Auditorium Wednesday morning. He said teachers are often “shackled” when it comes do doing their job. 

comer.house.gov, cropped

U.S. Congressman James Comer discussed Syria, healthcare, tax reform and thoughts about President Trump with Murray-Calloway County business leaders at a Chamber of Commerce breakfast on Tuesday morning. 

Courtesy CVI

When President Donald Trump signed his latest executive order last week, he surrounded himself with coal miners and returned to a familiar campaign theme: “job-killing” regulations. But in some corners of coal country, an environmental regulation is creating jobs. Stream restoration is part of a multi-billion dollar business, and some displaced miners are tapping into that revenue stream. Glynis Board of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports. 

The way environmentalist Craig Cox sees it, streams and rivers across much of the country are suffering from the side effects of growing our food. Yet the people responsible for that pollution, America's farmers, are fighting any hint of regulation to prevent it.

"The leading problems are driven by fertilizer and manure runoff from farm operations," says Cox, who is the Environmental Working Group's top expert on agriculture.

President Trump signed an executive action on Friday aimed at reducing red tape. It directs each federal agency to set up a task force to identify costly regulations that could be scaled back.

"Every regulation should have to pass a simple test," Trump said. "Does it make life better or safer for American workers or consumers? If the answer is no, we will be getting rid of it — and getting rid of it quickly."

President Trump signed another executive order Monday morning, fulfilling another campaign pledge, this one to eliminate two federal regulations for every new regulation enacted.

Trump signed the order during an Oval Office photo op, saying, "We're cutting regulations massively for small business and large business," adding, "This will be the biggest such act our country has ever seen."

The order stipulates:

High Hopes For Hemp

Jun 27, 2016
Nicole Erwin, Ohio Valley ReSource

Farmers throughout the Ohio Valley want to revive a crop that was once a staple in the region: hemp. After a ban that lasted more than half a century, the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to grow hemp in research programs. Growers and processors in Kentucky are aggressively putting that research program to work in hopes of winning a share of the booming market for hemp products. 

Glynis Board

The energy that lights up, turns on, cools and heats our lives leaves a trail of waste. Natural gas is no exception. The waste from the gas drilling known as “fracking” is often radioactive. The gas industry produces thousands of tons of this “hot” waste and companies and state regulators throughout the Ohio River valley and Marcellus Shale gas region struggle to find safe ways to get rid of it.

Kentucky lawmakers are reviewing a proposal to add middle schools athletics to the Kentucky High School Athletic Association's oversight. It would mark the first time Kentucky middle schools fell under state regulation.

KHSAA commissioner Julien Tackett said currently there are no restrictions on the number of games played each season and no academic requirements for players and that distracts from student’s academics.