Psychology

Part One in an NPR Ed series on mental health in schools.

You might call it a silent epidemic.

Up to one in five kids living in the U.S. shows signs or symptoms of a mental health disorder in a given year.

So in a school classroom of 25 students, five of them may be struggling with the same issues many adults deal with: depression, anxiety, substance abuse.

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Antecedent behavior consequences (or the ABCs) of behavior analysis take a simple approach to understanding human behavior, unlike more complicated models seen in cognitive psychology. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Murray State psychology professor Dr. Michael Bordieri about methods of incentivizing behavior in ways that help us all.

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A commonly accepted fact in treatment that when you want to help people suffering from anxiety, you want to get rid of the fear. New research has shown, however, that fear may actually be helpful in treating anxiety. On Sounds Good, Dr. Michael Bordieri and Tracy Ross discuss using fear as a treatment method for some mental health issues.

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The so-called "bathroom bill" circulating state governments across the country, namely North Carolina, restricts transgender people to use bathrooms that align with their biological sex. Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam has recently questioned the need for a special legislative session called by fellow Republican lawmakers over President Obama's directive where public schools must allow students to use facilities consistent with their identity. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Murray State University psychology professor Dr. Michael Bordieri about these hot-button issues, which he calls "concerning." 

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Over a billion colds are estimated in the United States each year. Increasing research suggests that there's a psychological link between stress and the nagging illness, says Murray State University Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Michael Bordieri. He speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about this potential relationship.

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Psychology professor John Norcross found that went studying New Years resolutions, about 70% continue their resolutions beyond two weeks. The good news is that there's still time for those who have lapsed in their resolutions to get back on the wagon, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State University. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri on ways to accomplish goals and make behavioral changes that stick.

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With 2016 only a few days away, now is traditionally the time of year to start thinking about changes you want to make in your life. Many seek a fresh start for changes in habits and ideas in setting new year's resolutions, but sticking to them can be tricky. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Murray State University Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Michael Bordieri on how to keep to your resolution. 

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For the past 50 years, the predominant model in health treatment has focused on medication as the most important aspect of treatment for schizophrenia, but Murray State Assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Michael Bordieri says a couple of weeks ago a new study finds the combination of talk therapy with medication to be an effective treatment. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri about the study and the history of treating schizophrenia.

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Thanksgiving is typically a time when family members come together around the table and enjoy a nice meal, but sometimes the conversations can get heated or become difficult. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross and Dr. Michael Bordieri of Murray State University's Department of Psychology discuss some helpful tips for getting along better with relatives and being more effective in making interactions positive.

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Mindfulness is an emerging area in psychology with the potential to be useful in our everyday lives, says Dr. Michael Bordieri of Murray State's Department of Psychology. It's not a new psychological discovery, but has been a part of spiritual practices of Buddhism and eastern religion traditions for a millennia. Within the past 30 years or so, western medicine and psychology has taken interested in the practice of mindfulness as a way of paying attention to one's thoughts. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri about understanding mindfulness and ways to practice it in everyday life.

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