prison

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Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed legislation to change the climate for women in Illinois prisons.

President Trump campaigned on a promise of law and order. He courted endorsements from police unions. And he even hinted to an audience of police officers that he supported the idea of roughing up suspects (the White House later said he was joking).

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A work group studying Kentucky’s prison system predicts additional incarceration costs totaling more than a half billion dollars over the next decade, if further legislative remedies aren’t pursued. 

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Kentucky is re-entering into a contract with a private prison company, nearly a decade after the state abandoned the organization amid allegations of sexual abuse and mismanagement of Kentucky inmates.

More than half of female homicide victims were killed in connection to intimate partner violence — and in 10 percent of those cases, violence shortly before the killing might have provided an opportunity for intervention.

That is according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published Thursday, that takes a close look at the homicides of women.

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Officials say Kentucky's only maximum security prison has been placed on lockdown after inmates attacked eight workers.

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Gov. Matt Bevin's administration is starting a pilot project aimed at making sure more of Kentucky's prisoners get the skills needed to find jobs once they're released. 

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Gov. Matt Bevin has thrown his support behind a far-reaching criminal justice bill intended to keep those charged with crimes from re-offending after they’re released from prison.

Once upon a time, cigarettes were the currency of choice when those behind bars needed to barter. But these days, America's prisoners are trading with ramen.

U.S. Justice Department officials plan to phase out their use of private prisons to house federal inmates, reasoning that the contract facilities offer few benefits for public safety or taxpayers.

In making the decision, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates cited new findings by the Justice Department's inspector general, who concluded earlier this month that a pool of 14 privately contracted prisons reported more incidents of inmate contraband, higher rates of assaults and more uses of force than facilities run by the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

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