presidential election

From NPR: Kenyan graffiti artists are sending a literal peace train through the country as their presidential election nears. The artists are trying their best to stop the kind of violence that erupted after the last election.

Shelly Baskin / WKMS

Every four years a large group of voters get a chance to cast their first ballot for the U.S. President. These voters were m ost likely in high school the last time a president was elected. After a big turn-out of young voters helped push President Barack Obama to victory in the 2008 election, new voters have become a major focus for this year’s campaigns. So with both sides trying to turn young adults into their next party faithful, how does this next generation of voters decide which candidate is right for them?

We’re gearing up to air special live NPR coverage of the Second Presidential Debate, from Hofstra University in New York, tonight. Commentator and History Professor Dr. Brian Clardy writes an open letter to President Obama and Governor Romney about issues to consider before the debate, centered on U.S. foreign policy.

One of the greatest expressions of American democracy is going to the polls on election day and casting your vote. Yet, low voter turnout cast a shadow over the Kentucky May Primary. Commentator Richard Nelson says the health of the Commonwealth depends on citizen involvement in the election.

Kentucky voters have watched from the sidelines as the Republican presidential primaries unfolded in other states.  And when they finally get their say a little more than a month from now, it may not matter.  Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney appears on course to collect the one thousand, one hundred and forty-four delegates he needs to wrap up the Republican nomination, despite the best efforts of top challenger Rick Santorum.  Santorum is also facing pressure to drop out of the race.  The candidates still have primaries in eleven other states, including Pennsylvania, New York, and