president barack obama

Barack Obama / Facebook

In his first visit to Louisville while in office, President Obama on Thursday evening announced a new federal initiative called TechHire.

This story has been updated.

President Obama is scheduled to visit Louisville this Thursday to talk about the economy, according to The White House.

He’s planning a visit to the Louisville-based company Indatus. Obama hasn’t visited the city since becoming president in 2009.

But some recent developments may explain why he’s finally making a stop in Louisville, said Dewey Clayton, a political science professor at the University of Louisville.

President Obama delivers his State of the Union address tonight and is expected to focus on the state of the economy and its impact on the middle class.

Whitfield Calls For Travel Ban

Oct 21, 2014

Kentucky U.S. Representative Ed Whitfield has asked President Barack Obama to call for an immediate travel ban from West African countries affected by Ebola. Whitfield says recent events have tragically demonstrated how U.S. transportation networks can serve as conduits for dangerous pathogens.  

“Ebola appears to be spreading even within the hospital setting, we should not delay in taking action to prevent individuals carrying the virus from traveling to our country,” Whitfield said . “A concise and immediate travel ban for such individuals who live in or have traveled from certain West African countries is necessary to ensure the safety of the American people.”

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear has gotten a personal thank you from President Barack Obama for a smooth rollout of the health care overhaul in Kentucky.

Kentucky has not had the technical glitches that have plagued the federal health benefit exchange. More than 18,000 of Kentucky's 640,000 uninsured residents have signed up for coverage since Oct. 1.

And nearly 34,000 have completed applications. The federal exchange has been unable to accommodate large numbers of users. 

Wikimedia Commons

The Kentucky agency that oversees the federal nutrition program, formally known as food stamps, is critical of a piece of Congressional legislation to cut billions of dollars from the program. In western Kentucky, more than 42,000 households in the 1st congressional district receive financial assistance from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP.

Kentucky Community Health Services Assistant Communication Director Gwenda Bond said any SNAP benefit reduction will hurt those using assistance to help meet their nutrition needs. 

Kentucky Secretary of State/U.S. Senate

A conservative group is running a pre-emptive television ad attacking Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, who is pondering a possible campaign against Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The ad links Grimes to President Barack Obama by calling her the president's "cheerleader" in Kentucky.

Former Democratic Governor  John Y. Brown Jr., is disappointed with President Barack Obama's job performance and is criticizing the national party for "acting like socialists" over free enterprise.

Brown served as Kentucky's governor from 1979 to 1983, and is successful businessman and a revered patriarch among state Democrats past and present.

In an interview with Pure Politics, Brown said Mr. Obama doesn't understand the economy and is more interested in "taking care of people instead of taking care of our Constitution" and getting people back to work.

Congressman Ben Chandler is joining a handful of prominent Democrats who will skip their party's national convention this year.

LRC Public Information

Congressman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., believes the U.S. Supreme Court will uphold the Affordable Care Act.