poverty

123rf stock photo

  The Kentucky Association of Food Banks is reporting an increase of people coming to their food pantries. KAFB executive director Tamara Sandberg said they saw 56% of their member banks report an increase in 2015.  Sandberg said winter is the KAFB's busiest season,  and  that the dropping temperatures force families in need to make some hard choices. 

More Americans are making more money.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new numbers on Tuesday showing that, after a brutal economic recession and years of stagnation, real median household incomes rose from $53,718 in 2014 to $56,516 last year. That's a 5.2 percent rise — the first statistically significant increase since 2007.

But, as NPR's Pam Fessler notes, "the median household income was still lower than it was in 2007."

www.aecf.org, Annie E. Casey Foundation

A new report finds more than a quarter of Kentucky and Tennessee children live in poverty and that economic conditions continue to worsen.

iStockPhoto

Approximately 9,000 people living in eight Kentucky counties will lose their food stamps in about a week for not complying with federal work and training requirements according to the state. 

iStockPhoto

The head of the United Way of Henderson County says her area is facing a poverty crisis.

Melissa Clements told county magistrates she’s noticed an increase of people coming into her office looking for help with basics like food, rent or utilities.

iStockPhoto

Kentucky adults with lower incomes were more likely to report difficulty in making a positive health change, according to a poll released Monday. 

As researchers have searched for ways to explain the childhood obesity epidemic in the U.S., many have posited that a child's race or ethnicity alone can put them at greater risk of becoming overweight or obese.

Kim Eagle, a professor of internal medicine and health management and policy at the University of Michigan, was skeptical of this thinking. His hunch was that poverty was a much more important part of the equation.

Eric Westervelt of the NPR Ed team is guest-hosting for the next few weeks on Here & Now, the midday news program from NPR and WBUR.

Now that President Obama has signed the new Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, a big question for many educators is: Will the changes help the populations most in need of better schools: students of color, students with disabilities and low-income students?

A decades-long decline in the death rate of middle-aged white Americans has reversed in recent years, according to a surprising new analysis released Monday.

The cause of the reversal remains unclear. Researchers speculate it might be the result of the bad economy fueling a rise in suicides, plus overdoses from prescription painkillers and illegal drugs like heroin, and alcohol abuse.

The wealth gap in America manifests itself not just in our pocketbooks but also in our bellies: The poor are eating less nutritious food than everyone else.

So concludes a new review of 25 studies published between 2003 and 2014 that looked at the food spending and quality of diets of participants in SNAP, the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as food stamps.

Pages