Poop

It's not often a town of roughly 1,000 makes national news. But then, it's not often a town faces a plight so ripe for media attention as Parrish, Ala.

There are a lot of words — and a lot of euphemisms — to describe the cargo sitting in a Parrish, Ala., rail yard.

"They call it sludge," AL.com reporter Dennis Pillion told NPR's Here & Now. "They call it biosolids."

Or, in other words, poop.

It has been there since February. At one point, as many as 250 containers of it — some 10 million pounds — were sitting, parked off the tracks, in Parrish, pop. 982.

The 700 cows on Brett Reinford's dairy farm are making more than just milk.

Each day, the girls are producing 7,000 gallons of manure. And that smells exactly like you'd imagine. "We had gotten complaints from neighbors in the past that had said, 'Hey, it stinks too much. Can you do something about it?' " Reinford says.

So he looked around for a solution and landed on a device called a digester. A digester tamps down the smell a bit, but, more importantly, it takes all that cow poop and converts it to electricity.

Local Chicken Farmers Turn Poop Into Profit

May 18, 2012
Casey Northcutt

Doug Hall and Dianna Johnson farm poop. Technically, they farm chickens for Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation, but they supplement their income by hoarding giant piles of decomposing chicken manure for compost.