Politics

Political news

The first presidential debate, to be held next Monday, Sept. 26, at Hofstra University in New York, will be divided into three 30-minute segments on three topics, according to the Commission On Presidential Debates co-chairman, Frank Fahrenkopf.

That's a bit different from the original announcement for the first debate, which said there would be six 15-minute segments. Farhrenkopf told NPR that it was moderator Lester Holt's decision to combine the segments.

The topics will be: the Direction of America, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America.

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky lawmakers are once again calling for transparency in the state’s pension agencies, which manage the worst-funded public retirement funds in the nation.

Rob Canning, WKMS

Republicans and Democrats are fundraising on the back of Gov. Matt Bevin’s controversial comments in which he predicted that conservatives might have to “shed blood” if Democrat Hillary Clinton is elected president.

Kevin Willis, WKU Public Radio

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin said Wednesday that his recent speech containing remarks about shedding blood was a warning against American apathy.

Ryland Barton, WFPL

Democratic congressional candidate Nancy Jo Kemper said Tuesday that Republican Gov. Matt Bevin should be impeached on the grounds that calling for innocent lives to be taken is illegal.

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

Rob Canning, WKMS / Fancy Farm, Bevin

Update: Gov. Bevin's comments have drawn fire from Kentucky Democrats. See below.  

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin says blood might be shed if Democrat Hillary Clinton is elected president.  

lightwise, 123rf Stock Photo

More than 40,000 Kentuckians have registered to vote or have updated their registration through the online portal GoVoteKy.com.

Ryland Barton, WFPL, cropped

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell asked Kentucky Republicans to pray for his party to maintain control amid what he calls a "challenging" election cycle. 

composite: (Johnson) Gage Skidmore; (Stein) JTuruc / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentuckians dissatisfied with the major party candidates for president have two other options.  

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