Pink Slime

Do not be alarmed, but you may be eating wood pulp. Or at least an additive that started out as wood.

If you buy shredded cheeses, including brands such as Organic Valley and Sargento, or hit the drive-through at McDonald's for a breakfast sandwich or a smoothie, or douse some ribs with bottled barbecue sauce, there's likely some cellulose that's been added to your food.

Cellulose is basically plant fiber, and one of the most common sources is wood pulp. Manufacturers grind up the wood and extract the cellulose.

Afternoon Round-Up 3/30/12

Mar 30, 2012 / wikimedia commons

Today on NPR: The Economic Impact Of Killing 'Pink Slime'


The Kentucky Senate has passed an amended bill that would help the state repay interest on a federal unemployment insurance loan.

There's a party in Washington, and everyone (outside of your deity, or deities of choice) is invited.

NPR reports the "Reason Rally" is being billed by some as a Woodstock for atheists, where as many as 30,000 are expected to gather and take heart in their stance. 

No more "pink slime" at Kroger stores. 

No More Pink Slime at Kroger

Mar 23, 2012

The grocery chain Kroger will no longer sell the type of ground beef containing what's recently been called “pink slime.”

It's a filler made up of fatty bits of meat that are left over from other cuts. In the industry, it's called “lean, finely textured beef.” It's treated with ammonia and meets food safety standards, but has recently been cited as an unappetizing example of over-industrialized food production.