pension

Sergey Kuzmin, 123rf stock photo

Governor Matt Bevin and state GOP leaders recently unveiled a proposal to overhaul the state's beleaguered pension systems. But what does it mean for teachers and other state workers? How will this plan affect people who aren't in the pension systems? Many agree something needs to be done about the state's pension crisis. So, if not this plan, then what could work as an alternative?

Jacob Ryan-WFPL/Kentucky Public Radio

Gov. Matt Bevin says the actual legislation aimed at shoring up Kentucky's woefully underfunded public retirement systems will be unveiled soon. 

Anna Kitzman, 123rf Stock Photo

Some of Kentucky's retired lawmakers living on public pensions of more than $100,000 a year would lose most of that money if a proposal from Republican Gov. Matt Bevin becomes law. 

Sergey Kuzmin/123rf Stock Photo

Representatives of state employees, teachers and police officers aren’t happy with Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposal to offer less-generous retirement plans and tinker with state worker benefits in an effort to save the state’s ailing pension systems.

Dr. Bob Davies, Murray State University

Murray State University is gearing up for autumn Homecoming celebrations. Matt Markgraf speaks with President Bob Davies on Sounds Good about some of the highlights, planning for proposed pension reform and budgetary pressures, a recent lecture on diversity, health services considerations and faculty accomplishments.

Governor Matt Bevin, via Facebook

Gov. Matt Bevin and Republican leaders of the state legislature have released a proposal that would make major changes to the retirement plans for teachers and other state workers.

LRC Public Information

A Republican leader in the Kentucky Senate still believes the General Assembly is on target to hold a late October or early November special session on pension reform.

J. Tyler Franklin

Lawmakers are still keeping tight-lipped on possible changes to the state’s pension systems, saying they’re still privately trying to get consensus among the Republican majority in the state legislature.

lrc.state.ky.us

As they draft pension reforms, Kentucky legislative leaders are seeking feedback from various interest groups. Indications are the state’s 138 lawmakers will go to Frankfort sometime in October to vote on changes in state public retirement programs.

123RF Stock Photo

Public employees in Kentucky are flooding the offices of the state's largest pension systems after state lawmakers have vowed to make changes to one of the worst funded retirement plans in the country.

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