Sorry, kids. Your pediatrician will probably give you the flu vaccine in the form of a shot this year.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Tuesday that it doesn't recommend using the flu vaccine that comes as a nasal spray. That's because the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at its performance last year and concluded it wasn't up to snuff.

Kosair Childrens Hospital, via Facebook

Norton Healthcare is giving a $1.25 million grant to the University of Louisville for pediatric research. Norton Healthcare says in a press release that the grant will provide one year of funding to research areas including pediatric cardiac medicine, surgery and clinical research — each of which will receive $100,000. 

Here's a stark fact: Most American children spend more time consuming electronic media than they do in school.

According to Common Sense Media, tweens log 4 1/2 hours of screen time a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks a year. For teens, it's even higher: nearly seven hours a day. And that doesn't include time spent using devices for school or in school.

Sure, you know you're not supposed to drink while pregnant. But what about those glasses of wine you had before you found out? Is a little OK in the third trimester? Or when you're anxious and can't sleep?

Those are the kinds of questions that women keep asking about pregnancy and alcohol. And science has not been a huge help in providing answers, though that's getting better.

A Kentucky state lawmaker wants to expand EpiPen use in schools. EpiPens are used to stop the effects of allergic reactions, and currently, state law only allows students with allergies to carry the devices. But Representative Addia Wuchner says not all students are aware of their allergies, and she will again file a bill that would allow schools to carry EpiPens for general use.