PACRO to Seek New Administrator, Director

Jul 2, 2013

With one-thousand United State's Enrichment Corporation employees soon to lose their jobs,the organization that seeks to limit the negative impact of the plant's closure has an uncertain future of its own. 

USEC is in the shutdown process at Paducah's Gaseous Diffusion Plant after failing to reach a new lease agreement with the Department Engergy which owns the plant.  

The government created the Paducah-Area Community Reuse Organization or PACRO to prepare the region for a plant shutdown and related economic impact.

The Purchase Area Development District is ending administrative services for an organization designed to ease the economic impact of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant's shutdown. The United States Enrichment Corporation ended its 1,000-employee operation at the Paducah plant in May. 

PADD officials say, in press release,  they've ended their services with  the Paducah-Area Reuse Organization because its mission will likely change.

USEC Continuing Shutdown

Jun 19, 2013
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  The United State Enrichment Corporation is at work shutting down its operations at Paducah’s Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The shutdown comes after losing a federal contract to continue uranium enrichment operations at the Department of Energy owned site.

The Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization or PACRO is working with union and economic development officials to garner support for soon to be unemployed workers at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. USEC announced last week it won't continue it's enriching process at the Department of Energy owned site. 

Purchase Area Development District Special Projects Coordinator Mary-Anne Medlock said workers will soon receive a survey to help understand the plant's demographics to aid in an seeking an emergency grant from the Department of Labor.


The United States Enrichment Corporation’s shutdown at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant will not affect the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Shawnee Fossil Plant near Paducah.

TVA Spokesman Scott Brooks said that Shawnee, like all of TVA’s fossil plants, provides power to the general grid and characterizes USEC’s closing as the loss of one customer.

The United State's Enrichment Corporation is ending uranium enrichment at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant saying that there were not enough taxpayer benefits to extend enrichment.

USEC has operated the DOE's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion plant since July 1993 and will stop enriching uranium at the end of May. USEC expects to begin reducing the plant’s workforce in the coming months. However, the corporation plans to continue managing inventory and meeting customer orders in addition to transitioning the plant back to the DOE into 2014.

LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky is suspending planned layoffs of up to 145 workers for 30 days.

The suspension of layoffs, originally set to begin June 3, comes after the Department of Energy has submitted a reprogramming request to Congress. The request could result in more federal funding for LATA, and a restructuring or reduction of the planned layoffs.

Members of the Kentucky Congressional delegation are giving Department of Energy leaders until June 14th to develop a long-term plan for the future of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

One of the agencies contracted to clean up the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is donating used computer equipment to a local technical school.

DUF6, a uranium cleanup project of Babcock and Wilcox Conversion Services, transferred 223 computers and printers to the Fulton County Area Technical Center in Hickman late last month.

Principal Tom Pyron said the center, which provides technology and trade education for area high school students, was under budget pressure that the donation relieves.

The company contracted for clean-up at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant has notified employees of impending layoffs of up to 145 workers.

LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky currently employs 320 people at the Paducah site. The cuts come from the federal sequester and a lack of funding from the Department of Energy, which contracted LATA for the clean-up.