The Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization is progressing with GE Hitachi’s plans to construct a laser enrichment facility.

Lance Dennee

With a lay-off looming of around 360 workers at Paducah’s United States Enrichment Corporation plant, the Purchase-Area Community Reuse Organization  (PACRO) continues to fight for $175m in funding from the DOE for site cleanup to put people to work.

The director of the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization, or PACRO, says negotiations are going well between the U.S. Department of Energy and General Electric-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment for use of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site.

Charlie Martin said the two parties have had multiple meetings in Lexington, Ky. and Washington D.C. since beginning negotiations in November and thinks an agreement will be reached soon.

PACRO Continues With Mission Despite DOE-GLE Negotiations

Dec 27, 2013

Despite ongoing negotiations between G-E Hitachi and the Department of Energy the group tasked with mitigating economic losses from the closure of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion plant has a lot of work to do.  G-E is hoping to re-enrich spent uranium stored at the PGDP using laser technology.

Several items of business have been left undiscussed after the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization failed to achieve a quorum at Wednesday's meeting. The group which is charged with mitigating the effects of the Paducah gaseous diffusion plant shutdown missed discussion regarding updates about General Electric Hitatchi, and site clean-up funding.

John Paul Henry

October brings the second round of layoffs at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For local business owners, that is money out of their pockets. One local community staple, just down the road from the plant, has counted on those paychecks for generations.

Most any morning you can find Ray Leigh in the back of a green cinder block building tucked off the Old Highway 60 outside of Kevil, Kentucky. 

There'll be smoke rising from out back, and he'll be cooking barbecue. Strictly old school, coal shoveled barbecue.

Mayor Kaler Replaces Hoover As PACRO Chair

Sep 6, 2013

Paducah Mayor Gayle Kaler succeeded Jerry Hoover as chair of the Paducah Area Community Re-use Organization yesterday, as the PACRO board accepts Hoover's resignation and Paducah Economic Development's proposed administrator contract. 


The shakeup comes after the early retirement of PACRO’S former executive director, the termination of the Purchase Area Development District administration, and Hoover’s resignation due to health concerns.  In assuming the chair, Kaler said she would like to see PACRO become more effective, and learn from Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization.  PED is basing much of its marketing and asset sale strategy on that group’s model.

PED Plans Next Steps in PACRO Admin Takeover

Sep 3, 2013

Chad Chancellor and the Paducah Economic Development are poised to step in as the new Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization administrator after a unanimous subcommittee vote Tuesday at the Commerce Center in Paducah.

The vote comes a week late after a PACRO subcommittee and the board broke a series of Kentucky Open Meetings and Open Records Laws, which rendered last week's meetings void.

PACRO Takes No Action Due to Violating Open Meetings Law

Aug 29, 2013
John Paul Henry

Meeting legality and procedure led discussion Thursday at a special called Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization (PACRO) board meeting, instead of deciding who will next run the organization.

The organization's uncertain administration situation remains as a round of United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) layoffs approaches in October. PACRO's charge is to mitigate the effects of more than 1,000 layoffs at the federally owned plant.   

John Paul Henry

The federally funded group tasked with mitigating the effects of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant’s closure blocked the press from accessing much of its public meeting Wednesday as the committee members listened to two proposals about the organization’s administrative future.  

PACRO board members didn’t cite a specific statute related to Kentucky’s Open Meetings Law when removing members of the media, which the law requires. The board also didn’t issue a public agenda for the meeting, also required by law.