owensboro

omu.org

A coal-fired power plant in Western Kentucky will stop burning coal entirely in the next five years. The Owensboro Municipal Utility’s board made the decision last week to retire the second unit of the Elmer Smith power plant in Owensboro, marking the end of the utility’s 116 years of burning coal in the city.

Owensboro Public Schools

 Owensboro Public Schools would be hit with a cut of $1 million  a year if the proposed federal budget is approved.

Nick Brake, Superintendent of Owensboro Public Schools, was in Washington, D.C. during this past week meeting with the region’s Congressional delegation. He said he urged legislators to maintain critical funding for education.

ALAN WARREN, via WKYU

The International Bluegrass Music Museum in Owensboro has received an extensive collection of bluegrass CDs, LPs, cassette tapes, books and recorded radio shows.

Rhonda Miller, WKYU

Police officers in Kentucky have an increasingly broad range of training that includes responding to situations where someone has mental health issues.

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Cornhole, a game made popular in backyards and at football tailgate parties, is holding its world championships in Kentucky this summer.

Sandefur Training Center, via WKYU-FM

A training center for adults with disabilities in Owensboro is consolidating services at its Henderson location in February. The Sandefur Training Center has been a workshop where adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities work on a variety of basic production projects for local companies.

International Bluegrass Music Center

Officials say construction has stalled on the International Bluegrass Music Center in western Kentucky after the Indiana company building the structure filed for bankruptcy.

via Owensboro Islamic Center Facebook page

  The Islamic Center of Owensboro has been vandalized for the second time in less than a year. Dr. Aseedu Kalik, treasurer for the center, told local media that paint was thrown at the Islamic Center sign sometime over the weekend.

A manufacturer of non-cigarette tobacco products is increasing its footprint in Owensboro. 

Swedish Match opened its new $3.5 million, 10,000-square-foot expansion Tuesday at the company’s current location.  The expansion will increase product research and testing capabilities. 

Thord Hassler, Vice President for Research and Development, says despite efforts in the U.S. to discourage smoking, the use of tobacco-related products remains consistent.

"There's been a gradual shift away from cigarettes to other products," Hassler told WKU Public Radio.  "I think all in all, in the U.S., there's a slight decline year by year, but it's very slow."

The expansion of the company’s research and development department is not expected to create jobs, but could lead to the creation of new products. The company has a current workforce of 355 in Owensboro.

Swedish Match produces chewing tobacco, cigars, and matches.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

Common legislation known as “Right to Farm” bills date to the 1970s, as expanding development encroached on traditional farming areas. But as Nicole Erwin of Ohio Valley ReSource reports, some Daviess County, Kentucky residents say that well-meaning law has been used to shield an industrial scale hog operation.

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