Obesity

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Kentucky has the fifth highest obesity rate in the nation.

The commonwealth also has the dubious distinction of being only one of two states that saw an increase in obesity levels between 2014 and last year.Kentucky has the fifth highest obesity rate in the nation.

Kurhan, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky is no longer among the top five states with the highest obesity rates, according to a new analysis.

State of Obesity,” a report by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health, lists Kentucky as having the 12th-highest obesity rate in the country, at 31.6 percent.

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

So what does it mean to be hungry?

That's a question that occurred to us as we read some encouraging news: The world isn't as hungry as it used to be.

A U.N. report has noted that 795 million people were hungry in the year 2014. That's a mind-boggling number. But in fact it's 200 million lower than the estimated 1 billion hungry people in 1990.

The improvement is especially impressive because the world population has gone up by around 2 billion since the '90s.

Fried Dough / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

More Kentuckians are supportive of higher insurance rates for smokers than for those who are obese, according to a new health issues poll.

The Foundation for a Health Kentucky conducted the study which found a majority of non smokers and former smokers agree higher rates are justifiable for smokers.

Kyhealthnow / Facebook

More Kentuckians are insured, protected from second-hand smoke and making healthier lifestyle choices, according to a recently released preliminary report on Gov. Steve Beshear’s kyhealthnow initiative.

A new study says economic factors such as the concentration of major grocery stores and restaurants may explain the rise in obesity. 

University of Louisville researcher Josh Pinkston helped compile data  examining 27 variables that impact body mass index.

Kentucky is the 47th healthiest state in the U.S., according to a United Health Foundation report released Thursday.

The state's low marks were attributed to a high prevalence of smoking, a high percentage of childhood poverty and a high rate of preventable hospitalizations, the report said.

Mississippi ranked 50th, followed by Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Hawaii topped the list as the healthiest state in the country. Indiana ranked 37th.

Soon, you may not be able to ignore how many calories are in the breakfast sandwich or doughnut you like to stop for in the morning.

The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday will release new rules that will require chain restaurants with 20 or more locations to begin posting calorie information on their menus.

"Americans eat and drink about one-third of their calories away from home, and people today expect clear information about the products they consume," FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said in a statement.

Being overweight hurts your earnings, and being an overweight woman is particularly tough on income. Back in 2004, a landmark study found that a 65-pound increase in a woman's weight is associated with a 9-percent drop in earnings. The authors of the study noted that, in terms of wages, the "obesity penalty" basically amounted to losing three years of experience in the workplace.

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