Obesity

It's no secret that American children have gotten heavier in recent decades.

Sarah Jane Sanders

Candy, candy canes, candy corn and syrup. Those are the four basic food groups according to Buddy the Elf. And this time of year, the gluttonous season, it seems like he is onto something.

CREDIT FLICKR/CREATIVE COMMONS/ FIT APPROACH

Kentucky has earned the unhealthy distinction of being the fifth “fattest” state in the U.S.  

Kurhan, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky has the fifth highest obesity rate in the nation.

The commonwealth also has the dubious distinction of being only one of two states that saw an increase in obesity levels between 2014 and last year.Kentucky has the fifth highest obesity rate in the nation.

Kurhan, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky is no longer among the top five states with the highest obesity rates, according to a new analysis.

State of Obesity,” a report by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Trust for America’s Health, lists Kentucky as having the 12th-highest obesity rate in the country, at 31.6 percent.

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

So what does it mean to be hungry?

That's a question that occurred to us as we read some encouraging news: The world isn't as hungry as it used to be.

A U.N. report has noted that 795 million people were hungry in the year 2014. That's a mind-boggling number. But in fact it's 200 million lower than the estimated 1 billion hungry people in 1990.

The improvement is especially impressive because the world population has gone up by around 2 billion since the '90s.

Fried Dough / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

More Kentuckians are supportive of higher insurance rates for smokers than for those who are obese, according to a new health issues poll.

The Foundation for a Health Kentucky conducted the study which found a majority of non smokers and former smokers agree higher rates are justifiable for smokers.

Kyhealthnow / Facebook

More Kentuckians are insured, protected from second-hand smoke and making healthier lifestyle choices, according to a recently released preliminary report on Gov. Steve Beshear’s kyhealthnow initiative.

A new study says economic factors such as the concentration of major grocery stores and restaurants may explain the rise in obesity. 

University of Louisville researcher Josh Pinkston helped compile data  examining 27 variables that impact body mass index.

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