Obamacare

The Affordable Care Act's requirement that people have health insurance or pay a fine is one of the least popular provisions of the law, and one that Republicans have pledged to eliminate when they repeal and replace Obamacare.

But take a look at some of the replacement proposals that are floating around and it becomes clear that the "individual mandate," as it's called, could still exist, but in another guise.

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President-elect Donald Trump campaigned on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, including the part that mandates people buy insurance or else pay a penalty. However, experts say people without coverage still need to buy it because it may be a while before that penalty goes away.

Republicans have been vowing for six years now to repeal the Affordable Care Act. They have voted to do so dozens of times, despite knowing any measures would be vetoed by President Obama.

But the election of Donald Trump as president means Republican lawmakers wouldn't even have to pass repeal legislation to stop the health law from functioning. Instead, President Trump could do much of it with a stroke of a pen.

KENTUCKY CABINET FOR HEALTH AND FAMILY SERVICES

Kentuckians wanting to buy health insurance on the federal exchange will have fewer options and higher costs.

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U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell predicts the federal health care overhaul is likely to undergo changes next year, regardless of who wins the presidency and which party has the upper hand in Congress. 

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Kentucky and four other states are again suing the Obama administration over its efforts to strengthen discrimination protections for transgender people. 

The lawsuit filed Tuesday in a North Texas federal court seeks to block parts of a nondiscrimination mandate of President Barack Obama's healthcare law. 

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Aetna will pull out of the 10 counties in Kentucky where it offers health insurance via the state health exchange starting in 2017.

Benefind website screenshot

After the troubled rollout earlier this year of Benefind — Kentucky’s new online portal for welfare services — state officials say they are still working out the kinks in the program.

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Republican Tennessee lawmakers are making the case for a more limited approach to Medicaid expansion than the one proposed by Governor Bill Haslam. Haslam’s plan is called ‘Insure Tennessee.’ 

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A new, wide-ranging health poll shows that opinion remains split on the Affordable Care Act in Kentucky, with most unfavorable opinions coming from northern and western parts of the state. Those areas also happen to have the highest rates of uninsured in the state.

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