Obamacare

Open enrollment for Affordable Care Act insurance doesn't start for another six weeks. But the quirky insurance startup Oscar Health is launching an ad campaign Monday aimed at getting young people to enroll.

The company is boosting its ad spending after the Trump administration announced it would slash its ACA advertising budget by 90 percent.

The Trump administration is giving insurance companies an extra three weeks to decide whether to offer insurance plans through the Affordable Care Act markets, and how much to charge.

The extension comes as insurance companies wait for President Trump to decide whether he will continue to make payments to insurance companies that are called for under the Affordable Care Act but that some Republicans have opposed.

Ryland Barton, WFPL, cropped

President Donald Trump is using his bully pulpit to scold Kentucky’s senior senator Mitch McConnell for failing to pass a bill that would repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as ‘Obamacare.’

Cathy Yeulet, 123rf Stock Photo

For over three decades, Sarah Cox has given women pap smears, mammograms and advice about options for contraception. But her Louisville practice is small – only five people – and she can’t afford to provide her employees with health insurance. That benefit gap wasn’t usually a problem until one employee’s circumstances changed and they needed insurance.

The Affordable Care Act is not "exploding" or "imploding," as President Trump likes to claim. But Trump does hold several keys to sabotaging the insurance marketplaces, should he so choose — one of which his administration is reportedly weighing using.

Updated 6:56 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans on Thursday released a revised version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act, their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

Gage Skidmore, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Vice President Mike Pence will be in Lexington Wednesday as part of the White House’s campaign to roll back the Affordable Care Act.

Natalia Merzlyakova, 123rf Stock Photo

  A new report out from the left-leaning Commonwealth Fund finds more than 32,000 jobs could be lost in Kentucky by 2026 if the U.S. Senate passes its proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Most of those jobs would be in healthcare, but the report found other fields, like real estate, could also be hit.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul says Senate Republicans remain at an impasse over a bill that would replace President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. 

Americans really, really don't like the Senate bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

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