NWS

NWS Paducah, weather.gov/pah

According to the Paducah National Weather Service, this month is the 7th wettest July on record, for as far back as the records go: in 1937. ...And we're only 9 days in. 

noaa.gov / National Weather Service

The National Weather Service in Paducah says the region could see severe weather Saturday afternoon and evening.  NWS Meteorologist Chris Noles says southern Illinois, western Kentucky, and a small portion of northwest Tennessee will likely see severe thunderstorms that could develop into more hazardous weather. 

"Any storms that form mid-day Saturday," Noles says, "on through the afternoon will be capable of producing very large hail, damaging winds and possibly tornadoes as the environment does appear as if it will be favorable for supercell thunderstorms."

NWS

Update 2:15 pm: At the request of the McCracken County Sheriff, KYTC has closed the US 45 Ohio River "Brookport" Bridge in Paducah until further notice due to icing on the deck.

The National Weather Service’s Winter Storm Warning remains in effect through 6 a.m. Thursday morning as heavy rain creates flooding problems across our listening area.  

As temperatures drop below freezing this afternoon, rain will change to sleet and eventually snow through tonight before tapering off tomorrow morning.  

NWS has called for 6-8 inches of snow accumulation in the Jackson Purchase area and even higher amounts to the northeast. About an inch of ice and sleet will precede the snow.

Severe Weather Coming to Region

Apr 17, 2013
NWS

Severe weather is expected across the region over the next 48 hours.

The national weather service has issued a severe thunderstorm watch through 9:00pm for the  WKMS listening area. A wind advisory will also be in effect beginning at 1:00am.

Forecasters expect a second line of storms to reach the area in late afternoon tomorrow. The storms should last late into the night. Forecasters say the conditions will be favorable for high winds, hail and tornadoes. Rainfall totals are expected to be 1 to 2 inches. 

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet crews plan to pre-treat area highways ahead of freezing rain, sleet and snow expected to sweep through the region Thursday night into Friday. National Weather Service forecasters predict up to two inches of snow along a line north of Cape Girardeau to Madisonville with a mix of sleet freezing rain and snow south of that line.  NWS officials say the forecast may change.

Wikimedia Commons

Little damage is being reported throughout western Kentucky in the wake of a line of strong thunderstorms that passed through the area last night.  The storms lasted for about two hours, producing rain and high winds that downed trees and power lines.  The National Weather Service reports those winds gusted as high as 50 and 60 miles per hour in McCracken, Graves, and Marshall counties.  Kentucky Transportation Cabinet spokesman Keith Todd says a motorist in Calloway County struck a tree that had fallen across the road.  Otherwise, no injuries were reported last night.  N-W-S meteorologists

La Nina Comes to an End

May 4, 2012
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 La Nina is over, according to the National Weather Service.  The weather pattern based on central Pacific Ocean temperatures has been to blame for some of the unseasonable weather we’ve had over the course of a few years.  We’ve gone from the wettest April’s on record in 2011 to a very dry April this year.  To discuss some of our weather pattern oddities Chad Lampe  spoke with Warning Coordination Meteorologist Rick Shanklin.