NRA

The growing momentum for tighter gun control after the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla., is highlighting the National Rifle Association's history of aggressively confronting challenges to what it regards as Second Amendment rights.

Federal limits on both research into gun violence and the release of data about guns used in crimes are powerful reminders of the lobbying group's advantages over gun control activists. For decades, the NRA pushed legislation that stifled the study and spread of information about the causes of gun violence.

The National Rifle Association acknowledged that it accepts foreign donations but says it does not use them for election work — even as federal investigators look into the role the NRA might have played in Russia's attack on the 2016 election.

OFFICIAL PHOTO, PUBLIC DOMAIN

  A Republican candidate for secretary of state in Kentucky has apologized for a tweet that alluded to him shooting a congressman.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET Saturday

As a groundswell grows against the National Rifle Association in the aftermath of last week's school massacre in Parkland, Fla., several businesses say they are ending their partnerships with the gun advocacy group.

The brands — ranging from insurance companies to airlines to rental car agencies — announced their decisions on social media, many apparently in direct response to tweets demanding change under the trending hashtag #boycottNRA.

In trying to clarify his Wednesday comments about arming teachers and other school personnel, President Trump, a day later, aligned himself even more closely with the National Rifle Association on the issue of teachers with guns and beefing up school security.

So much so, they seemed, at times, to be reading from the same script.

Here's how the day started — with NRA Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC (emphasis ours):

BankingBum, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The National Rifle Association is rallying members after a Kentucky billboard was spray-painted with the message "Kill the NRA."

A liberal group is filing a complaint with the Federal Election Commission on Monday to demand an investigation into whether the National Rifle Association took contributions from Russians, which would be a violation of the law.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The National Rifle Association says it is open to new regulations on bump stocks, devices possessed by the mass shooter in Las Vegas that can be used to fire rifles similarly to automatic weapons. This comes as top Republicans in Congress appear open to the idea of a federal law banning the devices.

123RF Stock Photo

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam has signed a bill that requires cities and counties to buy metal detectors, hire security guards and check bags at many public buildings, parks and buses... or let handgun permit holders bring in their guns.

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

Top Republicans including Donald Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. Mitch McConnell and Gov. Matt Bevin will all speak at the National Rifle Association annual meeting in Louisville Friday.

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