NPR

Photo via givingup.bandcamp.com

The band Giving Up will be coming into Murray this week with a full head of steam, as its latest album, Garner Cardinals, was featured by NPR last week.

Updated Feb. 7 at 3:55 p.m. ET

Daniel Zwerdling, a longtime investigative correspondent with NPR, has retired after a tenure spanning nearly four decades. The network's announcement Tuesday coincided with published allegations of sexual harassment against the Peabody-winning journalist, including claims of unwanted kisses and inappropriate conversations.

Zwerdling, for his part, has publicly stated the allegations are false.

NPR Host Robert Siegel Signs Off

Jan 5, 2018

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the median number of years that American workers have been working for their current employer is a little over four.

I say that to acknowledge how unusual it is that I have been working at National Public Radio for a little over 40 years — 41, to be precise.

For the past 30 years, I've been doing the same job: hosting All Things Considered. And doing it very happily.

No one is more surprised by my tenure than I am.

In a note to newsroom staff, Senior Washington Desk Editor Beth Donovan announced updates and additions to the team.

All – In preparation for the 2018 election, the Washington Desk will once again add to its staff, this time with two political reporters and an editor.

For 30 years, Robert Siegel has pretty much been the voice of All Things Considered. He steps down from the host chair on Jan. 5.

During his career, one of the recurrent themes of his reporting has been language — and how we speak.

Back in 1993, he reported on what he heard as something new in speech.

"I heard it mostly from young women, but it was spreading among men, too: the phenomenon of making statements that sound like questions, a rising intonation," he tells All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish.

NPR Chief News Editor David Sweeney has left the company following allegations of sexual harassment filed against him by at least three female journalists.

"David Sweeney is no longer on staff," Chris Turpin, acting senior vice president of news, said in an email to staff.

"This is a difficult time for our newsroom and I'm committed to supporting all of you as we move forward. I know you appreciate that there are some questions I cannot answer in keeping with our practice to not comment on personnel issues, but I will do my best to address those I can," Turpin added.

As NPR's Board of Directors meet in Washington, D.C., this week, the network finds itself confronted by a series of dispiriting developments: a CEO on medical leave; a chief news executive forced out over sexual harassment allegations; the sudden resignation of a board chairman; fresh complaints over inappropriate behavior by colleagues; and a network roiled by tensions over the treatment of its female workers.

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn is going on medical leave for at least one month.

It comes less than a week after the ouster of NPR's head of news, Michael Oreskes, over sexual harassment allegations by multiple women.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

NPR's senior vice president for news, Michael Oreskes, has resigned following allegations of sexual harassment from several women.

The accounts of two women, first published by The Washington Post, describe Oreskes unexpectedly kissing them during meetings in the late 1990s, while he was Washington bureau chief for The New York Times. An NPR employee has also come forward publicly about harassment that allegedly occurred during a business meeting-turned-dinner in 2015.

In a note to staff today, NPR SVP of News and Editorial Director Michael Oreskes shared newsroom leadership staffing updates.

Colleagues,

We are at a time of transformation for NPR and public radio. We have never been more successful yet we have never faced stiffer competition. Our audiences expect more of us than ever before.

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