Neurology

Kurhan, 123rf Stock Photo

Murray neurologist Dr. Chris King says roughly 4% of Americans suffer from at least 15 headache days per month, with each occurrence lasting four hours or more. He says there are 60 different types of headaches, grouped into certain categories based on presentation. He speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about the different types of severe headaches ahead of a community forum on migraines next week at Murray State University.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

Community forums on neurology topics continue in Murray, with a forum on caring for aging parents at Primary Care on November 12th. Dr. Chris King, a board-certified neurologist, leads the discussion and speaks with Tracy Ross on Sounds Good about caregivers, challenges they face, the parent-child dynamic and resources available.

[Audio] Primary Care Hosts Community Forum on Multiple Sclerosis

Aug 26, 2015
WKMS

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a puzzling disease attacking over 2.3 million people in the world, with around 200 cases appearing each day. Half a century ago, an MS diagnosis was much more devastating than it has to be today. Primary Care Neurologist Dr. Chris King speaks with Kate on Sounds Good today about the disease, treatment options and Primary Care's Community Forum on Multiple Sclerosis happening tomorrow evening. 

Jenn King

Murray Neurologist Dr. Christopher King of Primary Care Medical Center was surprised at the large turnout at a community education meeting about memory loss back in May. He finds that the anxiety about memory loss and dementia leads to a feeling of isolation. He believes that early detection is important and there are resources that exist to help. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. King about his concerns.

Over the past few years, we’ve seen a number of reports from the National Football League, the National Hockey League, and other professional sports organizations about the tragic consequences that can come from a lifetime of hard hits and the effects of the concussions that come with them. There’s been speculation that several high-profile athlete suicides were related to what health professionals call Post- Concussion syndrome. Now, there’s growing concern that the hits young athletes suffer in high-school and college sports could have the same effects later in life. Dr.