Native Americans

Painted by Herb Roe, Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA-3.0,2.5,2.0,1.0

The earliest dates of activity at the Kincaid Mounds in Massac County, Illinois, go back to 1050 A.D. It was once a large village, the capital of a Native American chiefdom, which existed until 1400 A.D., says John Schwegman of the Kincaid Mounds Support Organization. On Sounds Good, Austin Carter speaks with Schwegman about the Archaeology Field Day at the site this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Trail of Tears Commission Powwow / Facebook

It is a celebration as much as it is a memorial. With festive regalia flying and the warm scent of Indian fly bread floating through the air, the 28th Annual Trail of Tears Powwow will be held this weekend at the Trail of Tears Commemorative Park in Hopkinsville. Commissioner Peg Hayes speaks with Matt Markgraf on Sounds Good  to tell us more about the festivities. 

Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site / Facebook

Over 700 years ago, before the time of Daniel Boone and even Columbus, a community of ancient Native Americans thrived in a network of villages lining the Mississippi River. This weekend, children and adults alike can glimpse into that past at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site with a Mississippian Culture Gorget (pronounced 'gor-jet') Workshop. Park Manager Carla Hildebrand and Park Programmer Jessica Crisp speak with Kate on Sounds Good about the workshop and guided tour this Saturday.

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.


From NPR: A Native American tribe sues big beer makers for selling millions of cans each year to a town of 11 people where residents of a nearby dry reservation come to drink it up on an almost daily basis.

This past week, hundreds gathered at Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site to close a chapter in the Native American history of our region.  They witnessed a ceremony honoring the reburial of the remains of Mississippian-era mound builders who lived in our area almost a thousand years ago.  For over 50 years, the owners of the land that now makes up the historic site displayed them as part of a tourist attraction called Ancient Buried City.